The County of Yorkshire


Last updated on September 9th, 2017

Administrative map of Yorkshire in 1832 showing Ridings and Wapentakes. Also showing extant Boroughs and the County of Itself of Hull. Source data for parish boundaries - Kain, R.J.P., and Oliver, R.R. (2001)
Administrative map of Yorkshire in 1832 showing Ridings and Wapentakes. Also showing extant Boroughs and the County of Itself of Hull. Source data for parish boundaries – Kain, R.J.P., and Oliver, R.R. (2001) “Historic parishes of England and Wales”. Unit names from Vision of Britain website by XrysD. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Is bounded, North by Durham and Westmoreland, East by the German Ocean, South by Chester, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, and Lincolnshire, and West by Westmoreland and Lancashire. It is the largest county in England, being about 130 miles long, and about 90 miles broad. It is divided into three Ridings: the East, the West, and the North; and these are sub-divided into Wapentakes. The North-Riding has the 12 wapentakes of Allertonshire, Birdforth, Bulmer, Gilling (East), Gilling (West), Hallikeld, Hang (East), Hang (West), Liberty of Langburgh (East Division), Liberty of Langburgh (West Division), Pickering-Lythe, wapentake of Rydale. The East-Riding has the 6 wapentakes of Buckrose, Dickering, Harthill, Holderness, Howdenshire, and Ouse and Derwent. The West-Riding has the 9 wapentakes of Abridge, Barkston-Ash, Claro, Morley, Osgoldcross, Skyrack, Staincliff, Strafforth, and Tickhill. Rivers: the Ure, or Ouse, the Wiske, the Swale, the Nid, the Derwent, the Calder, the Aire, the Don, the Humber, and the Ribble. It has 69 Market-Towns. It is in the Province and Diocese of York, and in the Northern Circuit. It contains 5961 square miles, or 3,814,940 acres. Population, 1,553,159.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850

Yorkshire Towns & Parishes

The Ridings Wapentakes and Hundreds Baines Yorkshire Past & Present

The Ridings, Wapentakes, and Hundreds. – The shire of York, being too large to be administered as a whole, was divided into third parts or Thridings, corrupted afterwards into Ridings. The meaning of the name was well known down to the time of the Norman conquest, one of the Ridings, the North, being spoken of as a Riding, or Thriding, in Domesday Book.
The word wapentake is of Anglian origin, and means a district in which the people were organized to take arms, when summoned to do so by their King or their local chiefs. The names of most of the Yorkshire wapentakes are older than the Danish invasion, and most of them are derived from Anglian or English roots. The wapentakes or hundreds were more numerous before the Norman conquest than they are now; but the greater part of the names of the ancient wapentakes are still preserved, either in those of the modern wapentakes, or in those of the lieutenancy divisions, which were formed, though in a very much later age, for the purpose of organizing the military forces of the crown in each of the three lord-lieutenancies of the county. We shall give the modern names of the wapentakes of the three Ridings; the names of all the Yorkshire wapentakes, as written in the Domesday Survey, A.D. 1084-86; and those of the modern lieutenancy divisions, made in a much later age, but for the same purpose. Even the ancient names, though now gone out of use, throw light on the early organization of the county for civil and military purposes.
Source: Yorkshire Past and Present; Thomas Baines circa 1868-73.

The Modern Names of the Yorkshire Wapentakes Baines Yorkshire Past & Present

West Riding :-

Ainsty
Agbrigg
Barkston Ash
Claro
Morley
Osgoldcross
Skyrack
Staincliffe and Ewecross
Staincross
Strafforth and Tickhill

East Riding:-

Buckrose
Dickering
Harthill
Holderness
Howdenshire
Ouse and Derwent

North Riding :-

Allerton
Birdforth
Bulmer
Gilling, East
Gilling, West
Halikeld
Hang, East
Hang, West
Langbargh
Pickering Lythe
Ryedale
Whitby Strand

Source: Yorkshire Past and Present; Thomas Baines circa 1868-73.

Parishes

East Riding Parishes
North Riding Parishes
West Riding Parishes

Lower Cargreen, Yorkshire


Lower Cargreen Langdale A Topographical Dictionary of Yorkshire 1822

Cargreen Lower, ham., in the township and parish of Darton; 2¾ miles from Barnsley.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Yorkshire By Thomas Langdale. Second Edition. Printed and Sold by J. Langdale; and sold by T. Langdale, Ripon. 1822.

Lower and Upper Snowden, Yorkshire

English: Snowden Crags. Northward view, Crag H...
English: Snowden Crags. Northward view, Crag House in the middle distance, High Snowden beyond. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lower and Upper Snowden W. R. Yorkshire Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

Snowden (Lower and Upper), two hamlets in Askwith township, W. R. Yorkshire; 2 miles NW of Otley.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A Fullerton & Co. N.d.c. [1870-72].

Low Bentham, Yorkshire

Low Bentham Langdale A Topographical Dictionary of Yorkshire 1822

Bentham Low, a parish town, in the wapentake of Ewcross; 4 miles from Ingleton, 9 from Kirby-Lonsdale, (Westm.) 12 from Settle, 15 from Lancaster, 71 from York. – Pop. 2,102. The Church is a rectory, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, in the deanery of Kirby-Lonsdale, and diocese of Chester, value, £35 7s. 8½ d. Patron, T. L. Parker, Esq. The township of Bentham is divided into four quarters, viz. Low Bentham, High Bentham, Mewith, and Grasingle.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Yorkshire By Thomas Langdale. Second Edition. Printed and Sold by J. Langdale; and sold by T. Langdale, Ripon. 1822.

Low Abbotside, Yorkshire

Low Abbotside The New Yorkshire Gazetteer 1828

Abbotside, Low, N.R. (1) a township in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang West, 5 miles N.E. from Hawes; inhabitants, 181. Whitfield Gill, in which is the picturesque water fall called Whitfield Force, divides the townships of High and Low Abbotside, which are districts, not villages.

Abbot-Side Low Lewis Topographical Dictionary of England 1845

Abbot-Side, Low, a township, in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York; containing, with the hamlets of Grange, Bowbridge, Helme, and Shawcote, 166 inhabitants. This place is on the north side of the river Ure, and comprises by computation about 5,000 acres of land: Whitfield Gill, in which is the picturesque waterfall called Whitfield Force, separates the township from that of Askrigg. Here the monks of Jervaulx abbey were first seated, and afterwards maintained a cell. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £42, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. Two poor Widows of the place, and four others from Askrigg, are eligible to the almshouses at Grange, founded and endowed by Christopher Alderson, in 1807.

Abbotside (Low) The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Abbotside (Low), a township in the same parish (Abbotside (High)), separated from High Abbotside by Whitfield gill, in which, about 5 miles lower down the dale than Hardraw force, mentioned in the preceding article, is the picturesque waterfall called Whitfield force. Pop., in 1801, 235; in 1831, 173. Houses 40. Acres 4,360. A. P. £1,294, Poor rates, in 1837, £188. — Here is an alms-house for six poor women, inhabitants of the townships of Askrigg and Low Abbotside, who receive a stipend of £10 per annum each. Not far from this place, and close to Meerbeck, Dr Whitaker informs us, is the original site of Jervaulx abbey.

Sources

  • The New Yorkshire Gazetteer or Topographical Dictionary; Stephen Reynolds Clarke; London 1828.
  • A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis Fifth Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.
  • The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1840.