Worcester St Alban, Worcestershire

St. Alban’s Parish, Worcester, Worcestershire in 1796


Is, probably, one of the most ancient in this city. It is bounded, on the east, by St. Helen’s parish, and on the west, by the Severn ; on the north, by the parish of St. Andrew, and on the south, by St. Michael’s. Its extent bears no proportion to the rest of the city parishes, the houses it contained in 1779, being only 27, and the inhabitants 124. It comprehends only the following parts of streets, not one entire street being to be found in it, viz. the west part of Fish-street, leading to Warmstry Slip, and to the Severn. In this angle it includes the Royal China Manufactory, now carried on in an extensive mansion, formerly the residence of the family of the Warmstrys, members of the cathedral of Worcester; Palace-row, and part of Bishop’s-street, leading to the College grates, form the whole traverse of St. Alban’s parish.

The church, which is a rectory, in the patronage of the dean and chapter, is situated at the north-west corner of Fish-street, where that street and Warmstry Slip intersect Little Fish-street and Palace-row. It is conjectured to have been founded by Egwine, the third bishop of Worcester, about the beginning of the eighth century, he having given its patronage to the monks of his newly founded abbey at Evesham. The structure of this church is very old, small, and gloomy ; and, although not actually built by St. Egwine, it may yet, in those respects, certainly lay claim to a Saxon origin. On the controversy between Alam, the priest of this church, and Alfnoth, priest of St. Helen’s, concerning the antiquities and customs of their respective parishes, perhaps no great stress is to be laid respecting the priority of the foundation of St. Helen’s church. The monks of St. Mary’s had too great an interest in the decision given in its favour, by St. Wulstan, for the church of St. Alban ever to have expected it.

Its internal aspect affords nothing to remark upon, but its sombre hue ; a modern repair has, however, secured to it a very decent appearance. The first incumbent, according to Heming’s Chartulary, p. 527, was Alam, priest, A. D. 1092 ; the present is the Rev. Edward Davenport.

Source: Green, Valentine. The History and Antiquities of the City and Suburbs of Worcester. London, Printed for the Author by W. Bulmer and Co. 1796.