Stanford on Teme, Worcestershire

Historical Descriptions

Worcestershire Delineated C. and J. Greenwood 1822

Stanford – a parish in the hundred of Doddingtree, upper division, 8 ½ miles W.S.W. from Stourport, and 122 from London. The church, which was erected in the year 1768, is a handsome Gothic structure, with an elegant tower built of stone dug out of a quarry close by, which was discovered just as the foundation of the church had been laid; the interior is neatly fitted up, and contains several monuments of the Winnington family, one of which is ornamented with a bust of the Right Hon. Thomas Winnington, formerly M.P. for Winchester, Lord of the Admiralty, and paymaster-general of the forces, &c. He died in 1746. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Hereford and archdeaconry of Salop; Rev. Edward Winnington Ingram, incumbent; instituted 1807; patron, Sir Thomas Winnington, Bart. Population, 1801, 140 – 1811, 122 – 1821, 194.

Stanford-Court, in the above parish, the residence of Sir Thomas Winnington, Bart. In the park is an old hermitage, called Stone-House, hewn out of the solid rock. On the top was a chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, wherein the religious used to make their solemn offerings. Some years since an offertory dish was found, supposed to be one used upon those occasions; it is now in the possession of Sir Thomas Winnington, Bart.

Source: Worcestershire Delineated: Being a Topographical Description of Each Parish, Chapelry, Hamlet, &c. In the County; with the distances and bearings from their respective market towns, &c. By C. and J. Greenwood. Printed by T. Bensley, Crane Court, Fleet Street, London, 1822.

Universal British Directory 1791

Stanford, near the hundred-house, is the seat of Sir Edward Winnington, Bart. The court is delightfully situated in a very extensive park, abounding with most delightful prospects, and a fine grove of oaks, having two large pieces of water. In the garden is a cedar of Libanus, planted by Sir E. Winnington. About a mile from Stanford is an old hermitage called the Stonehouse, raised on a steep ascent, in the bosom of great hills. Within the rock are some rooms hewn out of the hard stones; on top of it was a chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, on the feast on whose nativity here was a solemn offering; which ended, the assembly ascended by stairs cut out of the rock into the little chapel, where, finishing their devotion, they usually drank of a pleasant well, the water of which was famous for many disorders. A curious offertory dish is now in the possession of Sir Edward Winnington, Bart. and the inscription has puzzled many antiquaries. The old bridge across the Teme was built at the expence of Humphrey Packington, Esq. that being in a ruinous state, a new one has lately been erected of iron, similar to that at Colebrook-dale, which, on the 25th of September, 1795, gave way and fell. The accident was imputed to the slightness of the iron-work, being much lighter than that at Colebrook. The church, an elegant one, of Gothic structure, built of beautiful stone, from a quarry which was discovered in Stanford-park just as the church was begun, in 1768, stands on an eminence in the park, and is a fine object to the country about it.

Source: Universal British Directory 1791


Stanford Lewis Worcestershire Directory 1820