Aberedw Radnorshire Family History


Last updated on September 11th, 2017

Aberedw is a parish in the county of Radnorshire, South Wales.

Parish church: St Cewydd restored 1887.
The register of baptisms dates from the year 1690; burials, 1695;
marriages. 1700

Nonconformists: Independents, Congregational.

The land is chiefly pasture. The area is 4.807 acres of land and 54 of water; rateable value, £2,397; the population in 1911 was 211.

Aberedw Builth Wells

Churches

Parish church Aberedw
  • Aberedw Parish Church – Church of Wales. 120 sittings. Sexton (1920) Richard Morris.
  • Independents – Licensed 1830
  • Congregational – Opened Oct. 1871, 150 sittings

Parishes adjacent to Aberedw

Schools in Aberedw

Mixed National School

Public Elementary School (mixed), built in 1869 for 50 children.

Opened Jan. 17 1871 – 12 children present

Closed under s.13 of the Education Act 1944 when Radnorshire Education Committee (with the approval of the Ministry of Education), ceased to maintain Aberedw Voluntary Primary School.

According to the school logbooks, when the school was opened on 17 Jan. 1871 of the 12 children present only 7 of them could read. The 12 children were divided into two classes.

Mr. Stephens, the schoolmaster in 1871-1874 stated in the logbook that the playgrounds were too small and that most of the children go up to play in the churchyard.

By June 1871 attendance at the school had risen to 48.

Masters / Mistresses.

Mr. Stephens 1871-1874 Nov. 13.

Mr. Alfred I. Stokes 22 Feb. 1875 –

Mrs E. A. Bates 1920

Historical Descriptions of Aberedw

Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Aberedow, 3 miles S. Builth. P. 345
Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1845

Aberedw Or Aberedow (Aber-Edwy), a parish, in the union of Builth, hundred of Colwyn, county of Radnor, South Wales, 5 miles (S. E.) from Builth; containing 345 inhabitants. It derives its name from being situated at the mouth of the river Edwy, which, after flowing through the parish, empties itself into the Wye, the latter river here forming the line of boundary between the counties of Radnor and Brecknock: the Edwy is only a small stream, famous for its trout and eels. Within the short distance of a quarter of a mile from this place are various objects of great interest and attraction. The churchyard is bounded on one side by a steep precipice, at the base of which flows the Edwy, which from this point winds through a narrow defile of rocks, rising on one side to a height of nearly three hundred feet, and romantically varied by alternate stratifications of naked rock and green sward, partially concealed by hanging woods; on the other side the rocks, though their elevation. is less, have a more striking character.

Here a boldly projecting rock threatens with immediate destruction the traveller passing beneath it; there a perpendicular wall of solid rock, extending one hundred feet in height, presents its bold, unbroken front, richly mantled with mosses, ivy, and other parasitical plants, and in the clefts of which the larger birds build their nests. Among these rocks a rude cave, about six feet square, called Llewelyn’s Cave, is said to have been occasionally used as an asylum by that brave, but unfortunate, prince, Llewelyn ab Grufydd, the last royal defender of Welsh liberty and independence, against the overpowering army of Edward I.

English: The ruined walls A view along the rui...
The ruined walls A view along the ruined walls of Aberedw castle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A short distance north-westward from the church, and at the head of this beautiful and romantic dingle, Llewelyn had a castle, the ruins of which are yet standing on the banks of the Wye, and consist only of the fragment of a tower, or bastion, and part of a wall. During the defensive war which he waged against the English monarch, the Welsh prince summoned his adherents to a private conference at this castle ; but of the disastrous result of this movement a variety of accounts have been given, some of which cannot be reconciled with the localities of the district. Mr. Jones, the historian of Brecknockshire, who took great pains to reconcile the conflicting statements, says, that having marched to Aberedw, he was there surprised by a superior force of the enemy from Herefordshire, under the command of Edmund Mortimer and John Giffard, to whom intelligence of his arrival had been treacherously communicated by some of the inhabitants of this place. Thus unexpectedly attacked, Llewelyn fled with his men towards Builth, taking the precaution of ordering the shoes of his horse to be reversed, there being snow on the ground; which stratagem, however, was made known to the enemy by a blacksmith at Aberedw. Having arrived at the bridge over the Wye, he crossed it, and issued orders for its immediate demolition, before his pursuers arrived. Thus checked in their progress, the English returned to a ford, eight miles lower down on the river, which was known to some of the party, and thus effected a passage. Meanwhile, Llewelyn had proceeded to Builth, from which, failing in his attempts to procure aid from the garrison, he advanced westward, up the Vale of Irvon, on the south side, for about three miles, where he crossed the river, a little above Llanynis church, over a bridge called Pont y Coed, or “the bridge of the wood,” and stationed the few troops who had accompanied him in an advantageous position on the north side of that river, with a view to defend the bridge. The English, on coming up, made an attempt to obtain possession of it, but failing, they discovered a ford at a short distance, which a detachment of their troops secretly crossed, and coming behind the Welsh unawares, attacked them in the rear, and routed them: and Llewelyn himself was slain in a small dell, since called Cwm Llewelyn, or “Llewelyn’s dingle,” about two hundred yards from the scene of action, by one Adam de Francton, or de Frampton, who plunged his spear into his body without knowing the rank of his victim, and immediately joined his party in pursuit of the fleeing foe. Returning after the engagement, probably in search of plunder, de Francton discovered that he had slain the Welsh prince, whose head he immediately cut off, and sent to the king of England. The body was dragged a short distance, to a place where the road from Builth, two miles distant, branches off in two directions, one leading to Llanavan-Vawr, and the other to Llangammarch, where it was interred, the spot being still called Cevn y bedd, or Cevn bedd Llewelyn, “the ridge of Llewelyn’s grave.” From their infidelity on this occasion, the opprobrious designation of “Traitors of Aberedw,” is said to have been given by Llewelyn to the inhabitants of this place. About three hundred yards to the east of the castle of Aberedw, on the summit of an eminence, is a large tumulus, directly above the river Edwy, on the side of which is that most awful precipice before described, so beautifully mantled, and forming an object so truly picturesque from every point of view but this, where it cannot be observed without indescribable sensations of awe.

The parish is situated on a cross-road leading up to the new Radnor road to Builth, and is bounded on the east by the parishes of Rulen and Llanbadarn y Garreg, on the south by Llandilo Graban, on the west by the river Wye, and on the north by Llanvareth ; it comprises nearly 1000 acres, a considerable portion of which is good arable and pasture land well cultivated; and there are other portions thickly set with oak timber: the surface in some places is rocky and uneven, but the soil is in general favourable to the production of grain ; and good stone is quarried for building. The petty sessions for the hundred are occasionally held here. The living is a rectory with that of Llanvaredd annexed, rated in the king’s books at £12. 13. 4.; net income, £355 ; patron, Bishop of St. David’s. The church, dedicated to St. Cewydd, is a plain building, consisting of a nave and chancel, separated by an oak screen, in the later style of English architecture, with a square tower at the west end, which, if not rebuilt, appears to have undergone thorough repair in the time of the Tudors. There are two day schools, in which about thirty children are educated at the expense of their parents. Lewis Lloyd, in 1633, bequeathed a rent-charge, of which the portion appropriated to this parish amounts to £4. 6. 8. annually, and is received by the minister, who distributes £4 among such of the poor as receive the smallest parochial aid, and retains 6s. 8d. for preaching a sermon, according to the will of the donor. A bequest of £20 by Elizabeth Price, in 1742, for the benefit of the poor, has proved unproductive. Thomas Jones, a landscape painter of distinguished repute, and best known by his two pieces of the “Campi Phlegraei,” was born at Pen Carreg, in the vicinity of this place, where, having succeeded to the family estate, he resided upon it until his death, in 1803.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1842

Aberedw (Aber-Edwy), a parish, in the union of Brecknock, hundred of Colwyn, county of Radnor, South Wales, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Builth; containing 344 inhabitants. It derives its name from being situated at the mouth of the river Edwy, which, after flowing through the parish, empties itself into the Wye, the latter river here forming the line of boundary between the counties of Radnor and Brecknock: the Edwy is only a small stream, famous for its trout and eels. The surface of the parish is rocky and uneven, and the scenery pleasing and frequently picturesque: the view from the churchyard is extremely beautiful. The petty sessions for the hundred are occasionally held here. The living is a rectory, with that of Llanvarredd annexed, rated in the king’s books at £12.13.4.; present net income of the benefice, £355; patron, Bishop of St. David’s. The church, dedicated to St. Cewydd, is a plain building, consisting of a nave and chancel, separated by an oak screen, in the later style of English architecture, with a square tower at the west end, and, if not rebuilt, appears to have undergone thorough repair in the time of the Tudors. Here are two day schools, in which about 30 children are educated at the expense of their parents. A small plot of land was given by Lewis Lloyd, and, in 1746, the sum of £20 by Elizabeth Price, the proceeds of which are applied for the benefit of decayed housekeepers: the sum of £12 per annum is paid out of the rental of a farm called Vronoleu, in the parish of Llanbadarn y Garreg, the bequest of Mrs. Gwynne of that place, for distribution, in equal proportions, among decayed housekeepers of the parishes of Aberedw, Llanbadarn y Garreg, and Llanvarredd. The profits of this manor are under the superintendence of seven trustees, and are applied in apprenticing the poor children of several parishes.

Within the short distance of a quarter of a mile from this place are divers objects of great interest and attraction. The churchyard is bounded on one side by a steep precipice, at the base of which flows the Edwy, which from this point winds through a narrow defile of rocks, rising on one side to a height of nearly three hundred feet, and romantically varied by alternate stratifications of naked rock and green sward, partially concealed by hanging woods; on the other side, the rocks, though their elevation is less, have a more striking character. Here a boldly projecting rock threatens with immediate destruction the traveller passing beneath it; there a perpendicular wall of solid rock, extending one hundred feet in height, presents its bold and unbroken front, richly mantled with mosses, ivy, and other parasitical plants, and in the clefts of which the larger birds build their nests. Among these rocks a rude cave, about six feet square, called Llewelyn’s Cave, is said to have been occasionally used as an asylum by that brave, but unfortunate, prince Llewelyn ab Grufydd, the last royal defender of Welsh liberty and independence, against the overpowering army of Edward I. A short distance north-westward from the church, and at the head of this beautiful and romantic dingle, Llewelyn had a castle, the ruins of which are yet standing, on the banks of the Wye, and consist only of the fragment of a tower, or bastion, and part of a wall. During the defensive war which he waged against the English monarch, the Welsh prince summoned his adherents to a private conference at this castle; but of the disastrous result of this movement a variety of accounts has been given, some of which cannot be reconciled with the localities of this district. Mr. Jones, the historian of Brecknockshire, who took great pains to reconcile the conflicting statements, says that, having marched to Aberedw, he was there surprised by a superior force of the enemy from Herefordshire, under the command of Edmund Mortimer and John Giffard, to whom intelligence of his arrival had been treacherously communicated by some of the inhabitants of this place. Thus unexpectedly attacked, Llewelyn fled with his men towards Builth, taking the precaution of ordering the shoes of his horse to be reversed, there being snow on the ground; which stratagem, however, was made known to the enemy by a blacksmith at Aberedw. Having arrived at the bridge over the Wye, he crossed it, and issued orders for its immediate demolition, before his pursuers arrived. Thus checked in their progress, the English returned to a ford, eight miles lower down on the river, which was known to some of the party, and thus effected a passage. Meanwhile, Llewelyn had proceeded to Builth, from which, failing in his attempts to procure aid from the garrison, he advanced westward, up the Vale of Irvon, on the south side, for about three miles, where he crossed the river, a little above Llanynis church, over a bridge called Pont y Coed, or “the bridge of the wood,” and stationed the few troops who had accompanied him in an advantageous position on the north side of that river, with a view to defend the bridge. The English, on coming up, made an attempt to obtain possession of it, but failing, they discovered a ford at a short distance, which a detachment of their troops secretly crossed, and coming behind the Welsh unawares, attacked them in the rear, and routed them: and Llewelyn himself was slain in a small dell, since called Cwm Llewelyn, or “Llewelyn’s dingle,” about two hundred yards from the scene of action, by one Adam de Francton, or de Frampton, who plunged his spear into his body without knowing the rank of his victim, and immediately joined his party in pursuit of the fleeing foe. Returning after the engagement, probably in search of plunder, de Francton discovered that he had slain the Welsh prince, whose head he immediately cut off, and sent it to the king of England. The body was dragged a short distance, to a place where the road from Builth branches off in two directions, one leading to Llanavon-Vawr, and the other to Llangammarch, where it was interred, the spot being still called Cevn y bedd, or Cevn bedd Llewelyn, “the ridge of Llewelyn’s grave.” From their infidelity on this occasion, the opprobrious designation of “Traitors of Aberedw,” is said to have been given by Llewelyn to the inhabitants of this place. About three hundred yards to the east of the castle of Aberedw, on the summit of an eminence, is a large tumulus, directly above the river Edwy, on the side of which is that most awful precipice before described, so beautifully mantled, and forming an object so truly picturesque from every point of view but this, where it cannot be observed without indescribable sensations of awe. Thomas Jones, a landscape painter of distinguished repute, and best known by his two pieces of the “Campi Phlegraei,” was born at Pen Careg, in the vicinity of this place, where, having succeeded to the family estate, he resided upon it until his death, in 1803. The total expenditure of the parochial rates for the year ending March 25th, 1836, amounted to £268. 18., of which £194. 14. was for the relief of the poor, £60 towards county rates, and £14. 4. for incidental charges.
Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 87, Hatton Garden. MDCCCXLII.

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Aberedow, a parish in the hund. of Colwyn, Radnorshire, 14 miles south-west from New Radnor, and 4 miles south-east from Builth, in Breconshire, and included in the Builth union. Living, a rectory with that of Llanvareth, in the archd. of Brecon and dio. of St David’s; rated at £12 13s. 4d.; gross income, £417. Patron, the bishop of St David’s. It is situated upon the river Edw, at the union of which stream with the Wye, in this parish, are the remains of Llewelyn-ap-Griffith’s castle. Pop. in 1801, 333; in 1831, 344. Houses 65. A. P. £1,201. Poor rates, in 1837, £304. The neighbourhood abounds in beautiful and romantic scenery.
Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

England and Wales Delineated Thomas Dugdale 1835

Aberedwy. This delightful village derived its name from its situation, near the junction of the River Wye and Edwy. Nothing in nature can exceed the beauty of the neighbouring scenery. The Edwy descends through lofty walls of rock; in some places, broken into crags, which frightfully overhang the abyss. Near the place are the ruins of a castle, the retreat of the last native Welsh Prince, Llewelyn ap Gruffydd. The object of Llewelyn’s journey to Aberedwy was to consult the chief persons of the district, upon the best means of successfully opposing the King of England, then invading Wales. On his arrival he found himself disappointed. Instead of meeting with friends, he was surrounded by the enemy. Edmund Mortimer and John Gyfford, acquainted with his route, marched from Herefordshire, with their troops to meet him. The enemy were numerous – resistance was invain – Llewelyn withdrew to Builth. The mountains being covered with snow, he caused the shoes of his horse to be reversed, in order to baffle pursuit, but the treacherous smith betrayed him. Llewellyn broke down the bridge of Builth, but was closely followed by the English forces, who fruitlessly attempted to gain it. Sir Elias Walwyn crossed the river, with a detachment, about eight miles below, at a place called Little Tom’s Ferry Boat, and coming unexpectedly on the Welsh army, routed them. Llewelyn himself was attacked and slain, unarmed, in a narrow valley, not two hundred yards from the scene of the action. Adam Francton, the murder of Llewelyn, took no notice of his victim, but joined in the pursuit of the Welsh. Returning with the view of plundering the slain, he discovered the wounded person was no other than the Prince of Wales; for on stripping him, he found a letter in cipher and his privy seal. The brutal Francton, overjoyed that the Welsh prince had fallen into his hands, cut off his head, and sent it to the King of England, and thus perished the last native Prince of Wales.
Source: England and Wales Delineated by Thomas Dugdale assisted by William Burnett; published by Tallis & Co., Green Arbour Court, Old Bailey, 1835.

Administration

  • County: Radnorshire
  • Hundred: Colwyn
  • District: Builth
  • Sub-district: Colwyn
  • Diocese: St. David’s
  • Rural Deanery: Elwel
  • Post Town: Builth
  • Poor Law Union:
  • Petty Sessional Division: Colwyn
  • County Court District: Builth

Population of Aberedw

  • 1801: 333
  • 1831: 344
  • 1861: 281; Houses, 56
  • 1911: 211

Post Office

Post & Telegraph Office.

Postmaster 1920: George Arthur Harley.

Railway Station

Railway: Cambrian

Station Masters: 1920 Price Jones

Directories

Kelly’s Directory of South Wales 1920

Text of Aberedw - Kelly's Directory of South Wales 1920
Image of Aberedw - Kelly's Directory of South Wales 1920

Notes

1872 – Floods – entry in school logbook as follows:

July 15 1872 ‘The recent floods causing the main bridge here to be swept away have prevented the children on the Llandilo side from attending. (Aberedw Mixed National School Logbooks)

Family History Links for Aberedw

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