Situation of Radnorshire within Wales

Radnorshire in South Wales, is bounded, North by Montgomeryshire, East by Shropshire and Herefordshire, South and South-West by Brecknockshire, and North-West by Cardiganshire. It is about 31 miles long, and about 26 broad; and is divided into six Hundreds — Colwyn, Kevenlys, Knighton, Painscastle, Radnor, Rhayader. Rivers: the Wye, the Elan, the Aro, the Somergil, and the Lug. It has 4 Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of Llandaff, and in the Southern Circuit.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850
Index of Articles for Radnorshire

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The County of Radnorshire

Radnorshire in South Wales, is bounded, North by Montgomeryshire, East by Shropshire and Herefordshire, South and South-West by Brecknockshire, and North-West by Cardiganshire. It is about 31 miles long, and about 26 broad; and is divided into six Hundreds — Colwyn, Kevenlys, Knighton, Painscastle, Radnor, Rhayader. Rivers: the Wye, the Elan, the Aro, the Somergil, and the Lug. It has 4 Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of Llandaff, and in the Southern Circuit.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850

Radnorshire Towns, Villages & Hamlets

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Hay Poor Law Union

Formed 26 Sept. 1836 by Order dated 31 Aug. 1836.

The Workhouse was situated in Hay, Breconshire.

Hay Union

  • Population in 1881 10,222
  • Area in Statute Acres in 1881 89,695
  • Rateable Value in 1881 87,632

Places within Hay Union

County of Brecon:

  • Aberllynfi
  • Bronllys
  • Glynfach, or Capel y ffin
  • Hay, Breconshire (W.) (See Notes)
  • Llanelieu
  • Llanigon (See Notes)
  • Llyswen
  • Pipton, Breconshire
  • Talgarth, including the Hamlets of Borough, Forest, Trefecca, and Pwll-y-Wrach
  • Tregoed and Felindre (See Notes)

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Builth Poor Law Union

Formed 2 Jan. 1837 by Order dated 6 Dec. 1836 as amended by Order dated 16 March 1853.

The Workhouse was situated in Builth Wells.

Builth Union

  • Population in 1881 8,182
  • Area in Statute Acres in 1881 102,953
  • Rateable Value in 1881 48,656

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Abbey-Cwm-Hir, Radnorshire

Abbey-cwm-hir, Powys

Data

The Cistercian Monks of Abbey-cwm-hir

The Cistercian Monks of Abbey-cwm-hir

  • Status: Parochial Chapelry
  • County: Radnorshire
  • Hundred: Cefnllys Hundred
  • Union: Rhayader Poor Law Union
  • Registration District: Rhayader Registration District
  • Acres: 10,965

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Beguildy, Radnorshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer 1851

Beguildy (Lower and Upper), a parish in the hund, and union of Knighton, county of Radnor, South Wales ; 7½ miles north-west of Knighton, on the river Teme. Living, a vicarage in the archd. and dio. of St David’s, valued at £7 15s. 7½ d., and in the parliamentary returns at £142 9s. 6d; gross income £164; in the patronage of the bishop of St David. There are two daily schools here, one of which is endowed with £10 per annum. Pop., in 1821, 974; in 1831, 1,043. Houses 186. A. P. £4,124. Poor rates, in 1837, £451.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

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Burfa Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1842

Borva, a joint township with Bareland, in the parish of Old Radnor, liberties of the borough of New Radnor, county of Radnor, South Wales, 5½ miles (E.) from New Radnor: the population is returned with the townships of Evenjobb and Newcastle. This township, situated on the border of Herefordshire, is extremely well wooded. Offa’s Dyke passes through it, near which are the remains of an ancient camp.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 87, Hatton Garden. MDCCCXLII.

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Burva with Bareland Radnorshire Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1845

Burva, with Bareland, a township, in the parish of Old Radnor, liberties of the borough of New Radnor, county of Radnor, South Wales, 5½ miles (E.) from New Radnor: the population is returned with the townships of Evenjobb and Newcastle. This township, situated on the border of Herefordshire, is extremely well wooded. Offa’s Dyke passes through it, near which are the remains of an ancient camp.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

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Bareland with Burva Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1845

Bareland, with Burva, a township, in the parish of Old Radnor, union of Kington, liberties of the borough of New Radnor, county of Radnor, South Wales, 3 miles (S.W.) from Presteign; containing, with the townships of Evenjob and Newcastle, 345 inhabitants. It is situated on the border of Herefordshire, and is passed on the west, at the distance of about half a mile, by that remarkable work of the Saxons, Offa’s Dyke. It is assessed jointly with the township of Evenjob for the support of its poor.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

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Aberedw The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

Aberedow, a parish in the hund. of Colwyn, Radnorshire, 14 miles south-west from New Radnor, and 4 miles south-east from Builth, in Breconshire, and included in the Builth union. Living, a rectory with that of Llanvareth, in the archd. of Brecon and dio. of St David’s; rated at £12 13s. 4d.; gross income, £417. Patron, the bishop of St David’s. It is situated upon the river Edw, at the union of which stream with the Wye, in this parish, are the remains of Llewelyn-ap-Griffith’s castle. Pop. in 1801, 333; in 1831, 344. Houses 65. A. P. £1,201. Poor rates, in 1837, £304. The neighbourhood abounds in beautiful and romantic scenery.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

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Aberedw England and Wales Delineated Thomas Dugdale 1835

Aberedwy. This delightful village derived its name from its situation, near the junction of the River Wye and Edwy. Nothing in nature can exceed the beauty of the neighbouring scenery. The Edwy descends through lofty walls of rock; in some places, broken into crags, which frightfully overhang the abyss. Near the place are the ruins of a castle, the retreat of the last native Welsh Prince, Llewelyn ap Gruffydd. The object of Llewelyn’s journey to Aberedwy was to consult the chief persons of the district, upon the best means of successfully opposing the King of England, then invading Wales. On his arrival he found himself disappointed. Instead of meeting with friends, he was surrounded by the enemy. Edmund Mortimer and John Gyfford, acquainted with his route, marched from Herefordshire, with their troops to meet him. View full post…

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