The County of Glamorgan

A maritime county of South Wales, bounded, North by Brecknockshire and part of Carmarthenshire, East by Monmouthshire, South by the Bristol Channel, and West by Carmarthenshire. It is about 48 miles long, and about 28 miles broad, and is divided into eleven Hundreds, namely, Caerphilly, Cowbridge, Dinas, Powis, Kibber, Llangwelack, Miskin, Neath, Newcastle, Ogmore, and Swansea. Rivers: the Rhymny, the Taff, the Ogmore, the Avon, the Neath, and the Tavey. It has 10 Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of Llandaff, and in the Southern Circuit. Population, 171,188.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850

Glamorgan Towns & Parishes

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West Aberthaw Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1845

Aberthaw (West), (Aber-Ddaw), a small post and hamlet, in the parish of St. Athan, union of Bridgend and Cowbridge, hundred of Cowbridge, county of Glamorgan, South Wales, 7 miles (S. S. E.) from Cowbridge: the population is returned with the parish. This place is situated on the western bank of the river Ddaw, opposite the small port of East Aberthaw: near it is Seabreak Point, a promontory which protects the mouth of that river. Lime of excellent quality is procured in the vicinity.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Wales by Samuel Lewis Third Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. XLV.

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Tythegston Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Tythegston, a parish, with two hamlets, in Bridgend district, Glamorgan, 4 miles W by S of Bridgend r. station. Post-town, Bridgend. Acres, 2,871. Real property, £3,602. Pop. in 1851, 1,152; in 1861, 1,678. Houses, 340. The increase of pop. arose from extension of collieries, and of coke and iron works. The property is divided among a few. The living is a p. curacy, annexed to Newcastle. The church is good.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Taff and Cynon Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Taff and Cynon, a hamlet in Merthyr-Tydvil parish, Glamorgan; on the river Taff, 6 ½ miles S by E of Merthyr-Tydvil. Real property, £2,275.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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St. Fagans A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

FAGAN, ST., co. Glamorgan, S. W.

P.T. Cardiff (160) 4 m. N. W. Pop. 510.

A parish in the hundred of Dinas Powys, on the banks of the river Elay; living, a rectory with the chapel of Llan-Illtwrn, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Llandaff; valued at 400l. per annum; patron, the Earl of Plymouth. Area of rectory 2300 acres, and of the chapelry 1000 acres. It possesses a church, parsonage, and seventy-four acres of glebe. The vicinity abounds in coal and lime.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

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Radyr Glamorgan – The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Rhayadar, or Rhayadyr, a parish in Miskin hund., union of Cardiff, county of Glamorgan, South Wales; 4 miles north-west by west of Cardiff, on the western bank of the river Taff, and crossed by the Merthyr Tydvil canal. Living, a vicarage in the archd. and dio. of Llandaff; not in charge; certified at £15, and returned at £79; gross income £60. Patron, in 1835, the Earl of Plymouth. Houses 38. A.P. £858. Pop., in 180L, 196; in 1831, 227. Poor rates, in 1838, £152 8s.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

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Nelson Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

NELSON, a village in the E of Glamorgan; near the Monmouth, Pontypool, and Merthyr railway, 6 ½ miles NE by N of Pontypridd. It has a post-office under Pontypridd, and a station, jointly with Llancaich, on the railway.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Neath Lower Middle and Upper Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

NEATH (LOWER, MIDDLE, AND UPPER), three hamlets in Cadoxton parish, Glamorgan; on the river Neath, the Neath canal, and the Vale of Neath railway, 4, 10, and 12 miles NE of Neath. Acres, 8,770. Real property of L. N. £1,368; of which £551 are in mines, and £65 in the canal. Pop. in 1851, 216; in 1861, 174. Houses, 36. Real property of M. N., £4,405; of which £2,000 are in mines, and £60 in the canal. Pop. in 1851, 236; in 1861, 222. Houses, 40. Real property of U. N., £7,934; of which £4,584 are in mines, £1,000 in iron-works, and £112 in the canal. Pop. in 1851, 1,263; in 1861, 1,637. Houses, 316. The increase of pop. in U. N. arose from the establishment of ironworks1).

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Neath Abbey Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

NEATH ABBEY, a village in Dyffryn-Clydach hamlet, Cadoxton parish, Glamorgan; at the ruins of Neath abbey, adjacent to the Vale of Neath railway, ½ a mile N by W of Neath, Glamorgan. It has a station on the railway.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Neath Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

NEATH, a town, a parish, a sub-district, and a district, in Glamorgan. The town stands on the river Neath, the Neath canal, the Julian way, the Sarn Helen way, the South Wales railway, and the Vale of Neath railway, 8 miles NE of Swansea, and 37 ¾, by railway, WNW of Cardiff. It dates from very early times; and was called Nedd by the ancient Britons, and Nidum or Nidus by the Romans. A castle was built at it by Jestyn ap Gwrgan; and was rebuilt by Richard de Granville, to whom Robert Fitzhamon gave the manor at the conquest of Glamorgan. An abbey was founded on the bank of the river, about 4 a mile from the town, in 1111, by Richard de Granville; belonged at first to Grey friars, but passed to Cistertians; was visited by King John, in 1210, on his way to Ireland; was visited also by Edward I. in 1284; gave temporary refuge to Edward II., after his escape from Caerphilly, Glamorgan; made a great figure in the subsequent history and fortunes of the town; and has left some interesting ruins. View full post…

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Navigation Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Navigation, a place on the E border of Glamorgan; on the Taff Vale canal and Taff Vale railway, at the junction of the branches to Aberdare, 16 ½ miles N by W of Cardiff. It took its name from a canal-office here; and it formerly gave name to a railway station here, now called the Aberdare Junction. The country around it is very beautiful.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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