The County of Carmarthenshire

Last updated on April 17th, 2017

Carmarthenshire in South Wales, is bounded, North by St. George’s Channel, East by Brecknock and Glamorgan, South by Cardiganshire, and West by Pembrokeshire. It is 40 miles long, and 20 broad. The chief Rivers are the Towy, the Cothy, and the Tave. It is divided into eight Hundreds — Carnwallon, Carthinog, Cayo, Derllis, Elvett, Iskewnen, Kirkwelly, and Perfedd; it has four Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of St. David’s, and in the Southern Circuit. Population, 106,326

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Carmarthenshire Towns & Parishes

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Llangadock Carmarthenshire – Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

LLANGADOCK, a market town and parish of Wales, in Carmarthenshire, situated near the confluence of the rivers Towy and Sawddy, 29 miles N.E. from its post town, Carmarthen. It has a fine old parish church, dedicated to St. Cadog. Manf. Coarse woollen goods and stockings. Mar. D. Thurs. Pop. of par. 2789. It is a telegraph station, and a station on the Knighton, Central Wales, and Llanelly line of the London and North Western and Llanelly Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Llanelly Carmarthenshire – Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

LLANELLY, an irregularly built parliamentary borough and market and post town of Wales, in Carmarthenshire, at the mouth of the Burry river, 14 miles S.E. from Carmarthen. It unites with Carmarthen to form the Carmarthen district of boroughs. The town depends chiefly on the coal and iron mines in the neighbourhood, which have given rise to extensive manufactures of cast-iron goods and pottery. Copper ore is exported from Cornwall and smelted here. It has extensive docks on the estuary of the Burry. Mar. D. Thurs. and Sat. Pop. of parl. bor. 11,084. It is a telegraph station, and the terminus of the Llanelly branch of the Knighton, Central Wales, and Llanelly line of the London and North-Western and Llanelly Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Llandovery Carmarthenshire – Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Llandovery, a well-built municipal borough, market town, and parish of S. Wales, in Carmarthenshire, on the Towy, 23 miles N.E. from Carmarthen. There is an institution in this town, founded in 1847, in which every pupil is taught the Welsh language. There are no buildings of importance, with the exception of the parish church and some chapels for nonconformists. It has a money ord. off. Mar. D. Sat. Pop. 1855. It is a telegraph station, and the terminus of the Llandilo and Vale of Towy Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Llandilo Carmarthenshire – Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

LLANDILO, an irregularly built municipal borough and market and post town of S. Wales, in Carmarthenshire, on the Towy, which is crossed here by a stone bridge, 14 miles N.E. from Carmarthen. It has a handsome parish church, which was rebuilt in 1850, and several chapels for nonconformists. It is the head of a poor-law union district. Near this town is Grongar Hill, where, in 1282, the last struggle was made for the independence of Wales. Manf. Flannels and leather. Mar D. Sat. Pop. 5440. It is a telegraph station, and a station on the Knighton, Central Wales, and Llanelly line of the London and North Western and Llanelly Railways. A branch line runs from Llandilo to Carmarthen and Llandovery.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.