The County of Cardiganshire

Cardiganshire, a maritime county of Wales, bounded N. by the counties of Merioneth and Montgomery, E. by those of Radnor and Brecknock, by Carmarthenshire, and W. by the Irish Sea. Desc. Mountainous, interspersed with plains and mosses. Plinlimmon, 2481 feet high, is its greatest elevation. There are many valuable mines in Cardiganshire, which afford silver, lead, and copper. Cattle, sheep, and wool are the staple commodities of the county; and a large proportion of the latter is manufactured for home use. Rivers. The Teify, Arth, Claerwen, Wirrai, Ystwith, Rheidol, Towy. Area, 443,387 acres, or 693 square miles. Pop. 72,245.
Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Cardiganshire in South Wales, is bounded, North by Merionethshire and Montgomery, East by Radnorshire and Brecknockshire, South by Carmarthenshire, and West by the Irish Sea. It is about 40 miles long, and 20 broad. The principal river is the Tivy. It is divided into five Hundreds — Geneurglyn, Ilar, Moddyn, Pennarth, and Troedyroyr. It has five Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of St. David’s, and in the Southern Circuit. Population, P. 68,766.
Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Cardiganshire Towns & Parishes

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Map of Cardiganshire from A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1833

Image extracted from page 159 of volume 1 of A Topographical Dictionary of Wales ... with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, by LEWIS, Samuel, the Elder. Original held and digitised by the British Library.

Image extracted from page 159 of volume 1 of A Topographical Dictionary of Wales … with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, by LEWIS, Samuel, the Elder. Original held and digitised by the British Library. Via Wikimedia Commons.

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Map of Cardiganshire by John Speed 1610

John Speeds County maps of Wales for first published in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain by George Humble. Date 1610

John Speeds County maps of Wales for first published in The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain by George Humble. Date 1610

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Tregarron Cardiganshire Universal British Directory 1791

Tregarron or Tregannon, is seated on the river Tivey, South Wales, in a plain. It is a mean place, though governed by a sort of corporation. It has a handsome church; and a market on Thursday; fair, March 5. It is fifteen miles south-east of Aberystwith, thirty south-east Cardigan, and 203 north by west of London.

Source: The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture 1791. Volume the Fifth.

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Mydreilin Cardiganshire Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Mydreilin, a hamlet in the centre of Cardiganshire, 7 miles S by E of Aberayron. It has a post-office under Aberayron.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Aberath A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom 1808

Aberath, a parish in Cardiganshire, Wales, 14 miles from Aberystwith, and 10 from Lampeder, on the shore of Cardigan Bay; contains 124 houses and 656 inhabitants. It is a rectory, value 10l. Patron, the bishop of St. David’s.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

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Llanbeder Cardiganshire Principal Inhabitants Universal British Directory 1791

The principal inns are the Lion, the Swan, and the Three Golden Horseshoes. – The following are the principal inhabitants:

Gentry

Davies Mrs. Mary

Edwards Mr. Thomas

Leigh John, Gent. (F.)

Page Mrs. Mary

Phillips Mrs. E.

Clergy

Evans Rev. John

Phipps Rev. J. L. (F.) Vicar

Williams Rev. W. (F.) Curate

Physic

Lloyd David, Surgeon and Apothecary

Traders, &c.

Davies Jenkin, Peruke-maker

Davies David, (F.) Shopkeeper

Davies Mary, Baker

Davies Simon, Buckle-maker

Edwards David, Dealer

Edwards David, Engraver

Edwards James, Baker

Edwards John, Shoemaker

Edwards Nathaniel, Sadler

Edwards Samuel, Carrier & Victualler

Evan Thomas, Shoemaker

Evan David, General Accommodator of Foot Travellers

Evans Daniel, Victualler (Ship)

Evans David, Glover

Evans Evan, Shoe and Boot-maker

Evans John, School-master

Evans John, Victualler (Greyhound)

Evans Morgan, Shoemaker

Francis James, (F.) Maltster

Griffiths John, Butcher

Harris John, Taylor and Habit-maker

Jenkins David, (F.) Innkeeper

Jenkins Edward, Sadler

Jones Charles Edmund, (F.) Victualler, Skinner, and Farmer

John Evan, Staymaker

Jones Hugh, Post-master

Jones Joseph, Taylor and Victualler

Jones Mary, Victualler (Crown)

Jones Thomas, Butcher and Farmer

Lancet John, Excise-man

Leigh Chelton, (F.) Auctioneer and Innkeeper (Swan)

Lloyd Ann, Mantua-maker

Lloyd Mary, Midwife

Lloyd Miss, Shopkeeper

Morgans Elizabeth, School-mistress

Morgan John, Baker

Owen Ann, Shopkeeper

Price John, Fur-dealer

Price Mary, Dealer

Richard David, Bookbinder

Rogers Eleanor, (F.) Baker

Thomas Elizabeth, Baker

Thomas Evan, Architect

Thomas Evan, Carpenter

Thomas Evan, Cooper

Thomas Jenkin, Builder and Plaisterer

Thomas Jones Thomas, Shoemaker

Thomas Lettice, Baker

Thomas Morgan, Blacksmith

Williams David, Buckle-maker

Williams Edmund, Shopkeeper

Williams Evan, Farrier

Williams Thomas, Auctioneer and Innkeeper (Lion)

Source: The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture 1791. Vol. 3.

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Haminiog Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Haminiog, a township in Llanrhystyd parish, Cardigan; on the coast, 6 ½ miles NE of Aberayron. It includes the village of Henbelin, and part of the village of Llanrhystyd. Pop., 895. Houses, 198.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Goytre Cardiganshire Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Goytre, a hamlet in Llanarth parish, Cardigan; 5 ¼ miles SSW of Aberayron. Pop., 240.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Fach Cardiganshire Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Fach, a hamlet in Llanarth parish, Cardigan; 4 ½ miles SSW of Aberayron. Pop., 189.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Cardigan Poor Law Union

Formed 9 May 1837 by Order dated 12 April 18371.

The Workhouse was situated in St. Dogmaels2.

Places in Cardigan Union

Cardigan Union

  • Population in 1881 17,612
  • Area in Statute Acres in 1881 85,481
  • Rateable Value in 1881 54,483

County of Cardigan:

  • Aberporth
  • Blaenporth
  • Llandygwyd
  • Llangoedmore
  • Llechryd
  • Mount
  • Saint Mary’s in the Borough of Cardigan
  • Tremaine
  • Verwick

County of Pembroke:

  • Bayvil
  • Bridell
  • Cilgerran
  • Dinas
  • Eglwyserw
  • Llanfair Nant gwyn
  • Llanfihangel Penbedw
  • Llantwyd
  • Llanychlwydog
  • Maenordewi
  • Melinau
  • Monnington or Eglwys Wythiel
  • Moylgrove or Trewyddel
  • Nevern
  • Newport
  • Saint Dogmel’s (W.)
  • Whitchurch or Eglwyswen

A place known as Penllyn, having a population of 3 persons, is stated to be locally included in this Union3.

Cardigan Workhouse

Cardigan Workhouse This institution, which is some way from the town, in fact across the river in St Dogmael’s, was built in 1839/40 for the relief of the poor, needy and unfortunate of the district, following the passing of the infamous Poor Law Amendment Act in 1834. The building, intended to accommodate 120 inmates, was designed by William Owen of Haverfordwest. The workhouse layout followed the popular cruciform or “square” design, with its entrance block facing north-east. There were separate entrance doors for males and females. The building, marked as Castle Albro on the OS map, is now privately owned. The copyright on this image is owned by ceridwen and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Vagrants' block, Cardigan workhouse

Vagrants’ block, Cardigan workhouse These tiny lockups against an external wall of the main building were used for the overnight incarceration of individuals found wandering without means of support. Stonebreaking was the penalty and the finished product would be ejected down the chutes. Next day these tramps and beggars would be expected to find work or move on to the next Poor Law Union district. The copyright on this image is owned by ceridwen and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.


 

1. A statement of the names of the several Unions and Poor law parishes in England and Wales; and of the population, area, and rateable value thereof in 1881. Published 1887 by H.M. Stationery Off. London.

2. A statement of the names of the several Unions and Poor law parishes in England and Wales; and of the population, area, and rateable value thereof in 1881. Published 1887 by H.M. Stationery Off. London.

3. A statement of the names of the several Unions and Poor law parishes in England and Wales; and of the population, area, and rateable value thereof in 1881. Published 1887 by H.M. Stationery Off. London.

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