The County of Caernarfonshire

In North Wales, bounded by the sea on all sides, excepting on the East, where it is bounded by Denbighshire and a part of Merionethshire. It is about 45 miles long, and 13 broad. It is divided into ten Hundreds. River, the Conway. It has six Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of Bangor, and in the Northern Circuit. Population, 81,093.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Caernarfonshire Towns & Parishes

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Nevin Caernarvonshire Universal British Directory 1791

  • Nefyn, Wales Recollections From America
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Nevin, Nefin, or Newin, in North Wales. It is seated on the shore fo [sic] the Irish Sea, opposite Pulhelly, and is a very poor town. It has a small market; and three fairs, on April 4, Saturday before Whitsuntide, and August 25. It is twenty-two miles south-west of Caernarvon, and 250 north-west of London.

Source: The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture 1791. Vol. 5.

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Gloddaeth Carnarvon England and Wales Delineated Thomas Dugdale 1835

Name of Place: Gloddaeth; County: Carnarvon; Number of Miles from: Conway – 3; Llanrwst – 13; Llan. in Rhos – 3; Dist. Lond. -236; Population: Not given.

Gloddaeth. The inhabitants of this place nearly all find occupation in the Llandudno mines. In the neighbourhood of Gloddaeth, on a tract of land on the eastern side of the river Conway, stood the ruins of the celebrated Diganwy, or Cannoc; which, says a Welsh historian, was destroyed by lightening more than a thousand years ago. Many brass belts, and some weapons have been discovered here, and some fragments of the foundation walls are still distinguishable. Here is an ancient seat of the Mostyn family, and a valuable library of Welsh MSS. and printed books, collected by Sir Roger Mostyn.

Source: England and Wales Delineated by Thomas Dugdale assisted by William Burnett; published by Tallis & Co., Green Arbour Court, Old Bailey, 1835.

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Dwygyfylchi The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

DWYGYFYLCHI, a parish in the hund. of Uchaf, union of Conwy, county of Carnarvon, North Wales; 2½ miles west of Conwy, on the coast. Living, a discharged vicarage in the dio. of Bangor and prov. of Canterbury; returned at £109; gross income £126. In the patronage, in 1835, of H. and L. Eyton. Here are an Independent church, formed in 1807; and a Sunday and daily National school. Houses 80. A.P. £1,130. Pop., in 1801, 281; in 1831, 444. Poor rates, in 1837, £126.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

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Criccieth Universal British Directory 1791

  • Criccieth 1913: Caernarvonshire Sheet 34.13 (Old O.S. Maps of Caernarvonshire)
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Crickleith, 223 miles from London, is a place of great antiquity. Here are the remains of a strong castle, supposed to have been built by one of Welsh princes in the reign of King John. The gate and some of the walls are still standing, which appears to have been a very strong place. The town is at present much decayed. The government is vested in two bailiffs, who are assisted by some of the principal inhabitants. Market is on Wednesday; and there are three fairs, May 23, July 1, and Oct. 18.

Source: The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture 1791. Vol. 5.

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Aberconway Complete Pocket Gazetteer of England and Wales 1807

Aberconway, (Caern.) a remarkably pleasant town, which derives its name from the river Conway. It has an excellent port, is surrounded by a wall, and, being situated on the declivity of a hill, commands an extensive prospect. During the reign of William the Conqneror, a magnificent castIe was built here by the earl of Chester; this was demolished in the reign of Stephen, but Edward I. caused it to be rebuilt, and all the outside of it is yet entire except one of the towers, which fell into the sea by the rock giving way. The harbour is opposite the town, where are some ruins of another castle. View full post…

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Aberconway – A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom 1808

Aberconway, or Conway, a parish, and formerly a market-town of Carnarvon, Wales, 10 miles from Bangor, 18 from Denbigh, and 230 from London; it contains 182 houses and 889 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, value 7l. 7s. 6d, Patron, the king. The town is surrounded by a lofty wall with towers, giving one of the most complete models of ancient fortification in the kingdom; and on a rocky promontory stands the remains of its ancient castle, consisting of eight round towers, out-works, &c. Here are also the ruins of an ancient palace, built by the earl of Leicester, now inhabited by some poor families. The town is governed by an alderman and bailiffs, and was built by Edward I. The castle was first built in the time of William the Conqueror. The church is a handsome gothic structure; it has an inscription on the tomb of one Nicholas Hocker, importing that he was the one and fortieth child of his father, and had 27 children himself: died March 1637. – Pennant’s Tour.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

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Aberconway Universal British Directory 1791

Is ten miles from Bangor, and 229 from London. It is governed by an alderman and two bailiffs, is remarkably pleasant, and has a good port and river. It is surrounded by a wall; and, being on the declivity of a hill, the prospect over the river is as pleasant as can be imagined.

A magnificent castle was built here by the Earl of Chester, in the reign of William the Conqueror, and 1204, which was destroyed in the reign of King Stephen, but King Edward I ordered it to be rebuilt, and it yet remains one of the most beautiful structures in Wales. On the upper part of the walls are ten towers, and one higher than the others has four beautiful turrets. The walls in many places are from twelve to fifteen feet in breadth. The gate of the castle is lofty. The hall is a most lofty and spacious room, one hundred feet long, with breadth and height thirty feet. All the outside of the castle is still entire, except one of the towers, which fell into the sea by the rock giving way. A wood extends from the castle to the summit of the hill. View full post…

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Conway Parish Registers

The Conway parish registers, in the rural deanery of Arllechwedd, Diocese of Bangor, Caenarvonshire, 1541 to 1793. Vol. 1 (1900)

Author: Conway, Wales (Parish); Hadley, Alice, ed

Publisher: London, C. J. Clark

Notes: Due to the age and quality of paper, printing and binding of this book, pages are skewed, discoloration of pages and handwritten items in some of the margins.

View Conway parish registers 1541 to 1793
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Conway Parish Registers 1793

  • The Conway parish registers, in the rural deanery of Arllechwedd, Diocese of Bangor, Caenarvonshire, 1541 to 1793. Vol. 1
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Edward Owen Vicar

Baptized Anne daughter of John Griffith by Jane his wife, Jan. 6.

Baptized Owen, son of Robert Prichard of the parish of Bangor by Mary his wife, Jan. 12.

Baptized Owen, son of Griffith Roberts, by Blanch his wife, Jan. 13.

Buried Jane Roberts, a young woman, Jan. 19.

Buried Mary Evans, wife of Edward Peter, Jan. 25.

Baptized Mary, daughter of Hugh Jones, by Mary his wife, Jan. 27.

Buried Owen, son of Griffith Roberts by Blanch, his Wife, Feb. 1.

Buried Mary, daughter of Hugh Jones, by Mary his wife, Feb. 9.

Baptized Susan, daughter of Roger Rous, by Elizabeth his Wife, Feb. 25. View full post…

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Caernarfon Poor Law Union

Caernarfon Union

  • Population in 1881 43,997
  • Area in Statute Acres in 1881 97,635
  • Rateable Value in 1881 118,435

Formed 1 June 1837 by Order dated 5 May 18371.

The Workhouse was situated in Llanbeblig parish2.

Places in Caernarfon Union

County of Anglesey:

County of Caernarfon:

  • Bettws Garmon
  • Clynnog
  • Llanbeblig (W.)
  • Llanberis
  • Llanddeniolen
  • Llandwrog
  • Llanfaglan
  • Llanfair is Gaer5
  • Llanllyfni
  • Llanrug6
  • Llanwnda

1. A statement of the names of the several Unions and Poor law parishes in England and Wales; and of the population, area, and rateable value thereof in 1881. Published 1887 by H.M. Stationery Off. London.

2. A statement of the names of the several Unions and Poor law parishes in England and Wales; and of the population, area, and rateable value thereof in 1881. Published 1887 by H.M. Stationery Off. London.
3. A detached part of Llangeinwen was amalgamated with Llangaffo, by Provisional Order which came into operation on 25 March 1884.

4. A detached part of Llangeinwen was amalgamated with Llangaffo, by Provisional Order which came into operation on 25 March 1884.
5. A detached part of Llanfair is Gaer was amalgamated with Llanrug, by Order which came into operation on 25 March 1883.

6. A detached part of Llanfair is Gaer was amalgamated with Llanrug, by Order which came into operation on 25 March 1883.

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