The County of Breconshire

BRECKNOCK, or BRECON, a county of S. Wales, bounded N. by Radnor, W. b Cardigan and Carmarthen, S. by Monmouth and Glamorgan, and E. by Hereford and Monmouth. Desc. Mountainous, and about a third of the whole entirely waste and uncultivated. Rivers. Wye, Usk, Yrfon, Tawe, and the Taf, formed by the junction of the Taf Fechan and the Taf Fawr. Minerals. Copper, lead, abundance of iron, and great quantities of coal and limestone. Manf. Woollen cloth, wool, worsted stockings ; and there is a trade in timber, iron, cattle, sheep, swine, butter, and cheese. Ext. about 35 miles in length, by 30 in breadth. Area, 460,150 acres, or 719 square miles. Pop 61,627. In this county are Brecknock Beacon, which is the loftiest hill in S. Wales, being 2862 feet, and Cradle Mountain, or Pen Cadcr, 2660 feet above the level of the sea.
Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Brecknockshire, a county of South Wales, is bounded, North by Radnorshire, East by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, South by Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire, and West by Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire. It is about 35 miles long, and 30 broad. Rivers: the Uske, the Wye, the Irvon, the Tawe, and the Taf. It is divided into six Hundreds – Builth, Crickhowell. Devynnock. Merthyr, Penkelly, and Talgarth. It has four Market Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Diocese of Llandaff, and in the Southern Circuit. Population, 55,603.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Breconshire Towns & Parishes

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Vaynor A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

FAENOR, or VAINOR, or FAENOR WEN, co. Brecknock, S. W.

P. T. Brecon (171) m. Pop. 2010.

A parish in the hundred of Pen-Celli, situated upon the Lesser Faf river. It includes the hamlets of Coed-y-Cumar, Dyffryn, and Gelli, the inhabitants of which find employment in the iron-works of Merthyr. The living is a rectory in the archdeaconry and diocese of St. David’s; valued in P. R. 123l. 15s. The advowson was in the lords of Brecon, prior to the Reformation, but upon the attainder of the Duke of Buckingham, in the reign of Henry VIII., it reverted to the Crown. Amongst the curiosities which are spread over the parish, may be mentioned the various Carneddau, the wooden bridge, called Pont Sarn, the cave of the Dry Ford, Ogof Rhyd Sych, and the Craig Vawr and Pen Mael Allt rocks. There is a mineral spring here upon a farm called Nant Gwyn.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

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Senny Breconshire Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Senny, a hamlet in Devynnock parish, Breconshire; on a rivulet of its own name, 8 miles SW by W of Brecon or Brecknock, Breconshire. It has a post-office, of the name Senny-Bridge, under Brecon. Real property, £1,878. Pop., 244. Houses, 50.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Rhyd-y-bryw The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Rhyd-y-Brew, a parish in Defynoc hund., county of Brecon, South Wales; 8 miles west of Brecon, on the northern bank of the Usk. Living, a perpetual curacy in the dio. of St. David’s; certified at £2; gross income £150. Patrons, the inhabitants. Pop. with Llywell.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

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Pipton Breconshire Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Pipton, a hamlet in Glasbury parish, Brecon; 4 ¼ miles SW of Hay. Pop., 111. Houses, 19

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Penallt Brecon Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Penallt, a parcel in Llangattock parish, Brecon; on the river Usk, near Crickhowell, Breconshire. Real property, £3,651. Pop., 732. Houses, 134. Llangattock church and Crickhowell workhouse are here; and Troy House, a seat of the Duke of Beaufort, is in the neighbourhood.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Nantyain Brecon Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

NANTYAIN, a village in Maes-Mynis parish, Brecon; near Builth.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

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Llanhamlach Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Llanhamlach, 4 m. S.E. Brecon. P. 280

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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Llan-Aml-Llech England and Wales Delineated Thomas Dugdale 1835

Name of Place: Llan-Aml-Llech; County: Brecon; Number of Miles from: Brecon – 4; Crickhowel – 10; Merthyr Tyd – 15; Dist. Lond. -163; Population: 149.

Llan-Aml-Llech. Upon an eminence, between the village of Llan-aml-llech and Llangasty-tal-y-llyn is the monument called St. Iltut’s hermitage. It was a cistfaen, or stone chest, resembling that which stood at Cerrig-y-Druidion in Denbighshire, and the saint is said to have used it as his penitential couch. Here are some antique characters, believed to be the workmanship of the recluse. A pillar-stone formerly stood close to the cistfaen. The name Llan-aml-llech may be translated “the church on many flat stones.”

Source: England and Wales Delineated by Thomas Dugdale assisted by William Burnett; published by Tallis & Co., Green Arbour Court, Old Bailey, 1835.

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Llangynydr A New and Comprehensive Gazetteer 1838

Llangynydr, vil. and par. Great Britain, hund. Crickhowel, co. Brecon, South Wales. Pop. 1440. Abergavenny (P. T. 146). Liv. a rect. in the dioc. St. David’s.

Source: A New and Comprehensive Gazetteer: George Newenham Wright, 1838

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Llangasty Tal-y-Llyn Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1845

LLANGASTY-TALYLLYN (LLAN-GASTY-TAL-Y-LLYN), a parish, in the hundred of Pencelly, union and county of Brecknock, South Wales, 5½ miles (E. S. E.) from Brecknock; containing 163 inhabitants. The name of this parish is derived from the dedication of its church to St. Gasty, or Gastayn, an eminent British saint, who flourished in the fifth century, and is said to have been preceptor to Cynog, son of Brychan, who was murdered on the Van mountain, in the parish of Merthyr-Cynog; and its distinguishing adjunct is descriptive of its situation in front of the beautiful lake called Savaddan, on the banks of which the church is agreeably placed. The manor was granted by Bernard Newmarch to Reginald Walbeoffe, and, after successively passing to the several families of Williams, Parry, and Davies, was, with the exception of the advowson of the living, sold by the last to Philip Champion Crespigny, Esq., from whom it passed to his descendant, Charles Fox Champion Crespigny, Esq., and has recently been purchased by the present proprietor, Major James Price Gwynne Holford, of Buckland. The surface of the parish, which comprises by computation about one thousand five hundred and forty acres, is partly hilly, and partly flat: the only river is the small stream of the Llynvi, but within the parish is in cluded a considerable portion of Llyn Savaddan. View full post…

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