The County of Anglesey

The Menai Bridge 1850

The Menai Bridge 1850

ANGLESEY, or ANGLESEA, an island and county of Wales, in the Irish Sea, separated from the mainland by a narrow channel called the Menai Strait, across which there is a suspension-bridge of the same name, and the Britannia Tubular Bridge, which forms a part of the Chester and Holyhead Rail way. (See MENAI STRAIT.) Desc. It may be described as triangular in form ; the land for the most part is not divided into fields by walls or hedges, but it is well cultivated, and yields the usual corn crops. The coasts abound with fish. Rivers or Streams. The principal are the Alam, Braint, Cefni, Fraw, and Dulas. Manf. Trifling; but its copper and lead mines, from the time of their discovery in 1768 to 1800, were the most important in the kingdom. Since that period they have declined. Towns. Beaumaris, Amlwch, and Holyhead. This island is the Mona of Tacitus, and was the last stronghold of the Druids, of whose works it has many remains. Curious stone tables are to be seen in it; and there are several remains of architectural and monumental antiquities on the coast and in the interior. Coins, implements, and arms, both Roman and British, are still occasionally found. Ext. 20 miles long and 17 broad. Area, 193,453 acres, or 302 square miles. Pop. 54.609
Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Anglesey in North Wales, is separated from Caernarvonshire by the Menai Strait, and on the other side bounded by the Irish Sea; about 24 miles long, and 18 broad. It is divided into six Hundreds — Llyfon, Maltreath, Menai, Talybolion, Turcelyn, and Tyndaethwy. It has four Market-Towns; and is in the Province of Canterbury, the Diocese of Bangor, and in the Northern Circuit. Population, 50,891.
Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Anglesey Towns & Parishes

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Aberfraw Complete Pocket Gazetteer of England and Wales 1807

Aberfraw, (Anglesea) a small town situated on the banks of the Aber, whence it derives its name, and the adjacent lands are remarkable for producing excellent barley. Though now an inconsiderable place, it was anciently the residence of the kings of North Wales, who were stiled kings of Aberfraw, and some remains of the house of prince Llewellyn are yet to be seen. The river is navigable, during summer, for vessels from 30 to 40 tons burthen, up to its quay; and most of the lower class of inhabitants subsist by fishing. This town is distant 6 miles from Newburgh, 16 from Bangor Ferry, 20 from Holyhead, and 263 from London.

Fairs, &c. Here are 4 annual fairs, viz. Mar. 7, first Wed. after Trinity, Oct. 23, and Dec. 11, chiefly for woollen cloths and horned cattle. The weekly market, formerly held on Thursday, has been long discontinued.

Gentlemen’s Seats. About 2 miles from Aberfraw is Rodorgan, the seat of O. R. Meyrick, esq.; and nearly adjoining is Bodowen, Sir Hugh Owen.

In the neighbourhood of Aberfraw are 2 curious churches, viz. that of Llanguifin, which stands ia the middle of a small inland, accessible only at low water, except by a boat; and that of Llangadwalladar, an old romantic edifice, the windows of which are ornamented with ancient hieroglyphical paintings.

Source: Complete Pocket Gazetteer of England and Wales; Crosby Rev. J. Malham; 1807.

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Amlwch Anglesey – Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

AMLWCH, a seaport, post town, and parliamentary borough of Wales, in the island of Anglesey, 15 miles N .W. from Beaumaris, and forming one of the Beaumaris district of boroughs. It has a good harbour, which has been excavated from the solid rock. The mines, about two miles distant from the town, contain a considerable quantity of copper ore, but they are not so flourishing as they formerly were. Lat. 53″ 24’ N. Lon. 4° 21’ W. Pop. 5949, including the town and parish, of par. bor. 3207. It is the terminus of the Anglesey Central Railway, a branch of the Chester and Holyhead Railway, 17½ miles from Gaerwen Junction.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Anglesey Parishes

Below is a list of parishes in Anglesey, North Wales.

Anglesey Parishes

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Amlwch Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Amlwch, 375 m. N.W. London. P. 6217

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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Trewalchmai Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Trefgwalachmai, 10 miles N.W. Bangor. P. 699

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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Tregaian Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Tregayan, 8 m. N.W. Beaumaris. P. 188

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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Trefdraeth Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Trefdraeth, 10 miles S.W. by W. Bangor. P. 960

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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Rhoscolyn Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Rhoscolyn, 5 miles S.E. Holyhead. P. 1055

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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Rhosbeirio Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales 1850

Rhôs-Peirio, Llaneilian parish. P. 32

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

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