Perthshire

Index of pages for Perthshire

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Cupar Angus Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Cupar Angus, a parish and market and post town in Perth and Forfar, Scotland, on a small rivulet which falls into the Isla, 13 miles N.E. from Perth. Manf. Linen and leather. Mar. D. Thurs. Pop. of parish, 2929. It is a station on the Dundee, Newtyle, and Alyth branch of the Caledonian Railway, and also a telegraph station.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Culross Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Culross, a parish and ancient town of Perthshire, on the N. shore of the Firth of Forth, 5 miles W. from Dunfermline. At the E. end are the ruins of St. Mungo’s Chapel, and near these the remains of a monastery, built in 1217 by Malcolm, earl of Fife, the chapel of which now forms the parish church. It has various charitable institutions and schools. Post town, Alloa. It has a money 0rd. off. Manf. Cotton and linen fabrics. Pop. of parish, 1423.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Dull Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Dull, a parish of Scotland, in Perthshire, 4 miles from Aberfeldy. P0p. 3500.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Dunkeld Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Dunkeld, a post town and parish of Perthshire, Scotland, on the Tay, 14 miles N.W. from Perth. Itis of great antiquity, and was the capital of ancient Caledonia. The town is not well built. The scenery around it, however, has long been the admiration of all strangers. To the W. of the town are the ruins of an ancient cathedral, the choir of which now serves for the parish church. In the neighbourhood is the duke of Athole’s seat, with delightful grounds adjoining, in which are still shown the first two larches introduced into Britain, which were brought in 1738 from the Tyrol. Manf. Chiefly linen and yarn. Pop. about 2104, including the inhabitants of both the new and old town. It is a station on the Highland and Sutherland Railway, 15½ miles from Perth.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Dunblane Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Dunblane, a market and post town and parish of Scotland, in Perthshire, on the Allan, 24 miles S.W. from Perth. It is mean in its appearance, and consists of one main street, intersected by lanes. Its cathedral is now in ruins, except that part of it which serves for the parish church. It contains a good library, established by Bishop Leighton in 1670. Not far from this place is Sheriffmuir, where, in 1715, a battle was fought between the royal troops and the followers of the Pretender. The town gives the title of viscount, in the peerage of Scotland, to the duke of Leeds. Mar. D. Thurs. P0p. of par. 2528. It is a telegraph station, and a station on the main line and the Inversnaid and Stirling branch of the Caledonian Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Dargie Perth Topographical Dictionary of Scotland 1851

Dargie, a hamlet, in the parish of Liff, county of Perth, 3 miles (W.) from Dundee; containing 32 inhabitants. It is in that portion of the parish which formed the ancient parish of Invergowrie, now united, with Benvie, to Liff; and is about a mile west-by-south of Invergowrie church.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland by Samuel Lewis Second Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. LI.

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Abernethy – Topographical Dictionary 1808

Abernethy, a small town in Strathern, Perthshire, Scotland, near Dunkeld, 56 miles from Edinburgh; containing 297 houses and 1355 inhabitants, of whom 177 were returned employed in trade. It is situated on the river Tay, a little above the mouth of the Erne, and was formerly the seat of the Pictish kings, and the see of an archbishop, which was afterwards transferred to St. Andrew’s. Here is a tower of a circular form, 74 feet high and 48 in circumference, supposed to be of Pictish origin, and intended as a place of confinement for religious penance.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

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Aberfoyle Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Aberfoyle, a parish, and defile in the Grampian Hills, in the county of Perth, Scotland, 39 miles S.W. from Perth. In this parish are Lochs Katrine and Achray, and one of the most interesting scenes in Sir Walter Scott’s “Rob Roy” is laid here. Post town, Stirling. Pop. 565.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Aberdalgie A Topographical Dictionary 1808

Aberdalgie, a parish in the shire of Perth, Scotland, 30 miles from Stirling; contains 103 houses and 542 inhabitants.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

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