Fife

Index of pages for Fife

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Cupar Fife Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Cupar Fife, the capital of Fifeshire, Scotland, 8 miles W. from St. Andrews, is a royal and parliamentary borough, forming part of the St. Adrews district of boroughs, and a market and post town. It is situated at the junction of St. Mary’s Burn with the river Eden, and consists of several streets, with a number of lanes and detached houses. It has a church, county hall, grammar-school, and other public buildings, with reading-rooms. In former times there was a castle on Castle Hill, belonging to, the Macduff family, the Thane of Fife, and at the foot of the hill there was a Dominican monastery. Manf. Linen, leather, candles, snuff, bricks, and coarse pottery. Mar. D. Tues. Pop. of parl. bor. 508o ; of royal bor. 4980. It is a station on the Edinburgh, Dundee, and Perth branch of the North British Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Dysart Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Dysart, or Desart, a parish, royal and parliamentar borough, and seaport town of Scotland, in Fifeshire. The town is situated on the N. shore of the Firth of Forth, 12 miles N.E. from Edinburgh, and has now fallen into decay. It forms part of the Kirkcaldy district of boroughs. Post town, Kirkcaldy. It has a money ord. off. Manf. Ticking, checks, and flax-spinning. About 100,000 tons of flax are raised annually in the parish. Pop. of parl. bor. 7117. It is a telegraph station, and a station on the Edinburgh and Perth line of the North British Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Dunfermline Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Dunfermline, a market and post town, royal and parliamentary borough, and parish of Scotland, in the county of Fife, about 2½ miles N. of the Firth of Forth, and 13 miles N.W. from Edinburgh. It forms part 0f the Stirling district of boroughs. The town is irregular, owing to the nature of the ground on which it is situated, and some of the streets are narrow and inconvenient, but, generally speaking, the houses are neat and well built, and the shops are good. It has two parish churches, and various other places of worship. The ancient abbey, the ruins of which present many objects of interest, and which was founded in the 11th century by Malcolm and his queen, was a Culdee monastery. There are several charitable endowments, a town-hall, gaol, several public schools, a mechanics’ institute, new music-hall, and a handsome guildhall, with a steeple 132 feet high. View full post…

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Fernie A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

Fairnie, shire of Fife, S.

P.T. Cupar of Fife (30) 2 m. W b N. Pop. with Pa.

A small village in the parish of Monimail and district of Cupar.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

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Falkland A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland 1833

FALKLAND, shire of Fife, S.

Edinburgh 14 m. N. Cupar 10 m. W. Pop. 2459. Fairs, 2d Thurs. O. S. in Jan.; last Thurs., O. S. in Feb. and April; 3d Thurs., O. S., and June 26; 1st Thurs., after Aug. 12; 4th Thurs. in Sept.; and Nov. 1.

A market, post-town and parish in the district of Cupar, celebrated as having been once a residence of the Macduffs, Earls of Fife, and afterwards of the kings of Scotland. James V. and VI. made it their favourite resort, and the former added greatly to the magnificence of the palace, of which there are still sufficient remains to give an idea of the taste and splendour of its architecture. The town, including the suburb of Ballinbrae, is neat, though irregularly built, the principal street containing a good modern market-house, with a steeple and clock, where are held the markets, which are abundantly supplied with provisions, &c. There is also a plentiful supply of excellent water, introduced by leaden pipes, laid down in 1781. The inhabitants are mostly occupied in the manufacture of coarse linens and Osnaburghs, the chief trade of the place, which was anciently called Killgour, and was raised to be a burgh of regality by James II., in 1458, and confirmed as such by James VI. It is governed by three baillies, fifteen councillors (from whom a treasurer is selected), and a town-clerk, who are self-elected, and whose revenue, arising principally from the tolls of the market and fairs, is about 100l. per annum. The parish comprises 10,000 acres, nearly half being appropriated to pasture, and the rest to tillage. It contains also the villages of Frenchie and Newton, and abounds with quarries of good freestone and muirstone. The living is in the presbytery of Cupar and synod of Fife; patron, Thomson of Balniel. Falkland gives the title of Viscount to the ancient family of Carey.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.

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Aberdour Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

ABERDOUR, a village and parish of Scotland, in Fifeshire, on the Frith of Forth. 8 miles N.W. from Edinburgh. Post town, Burntisland. Pop. 1874.—-Another in Aberdeenshire, 36 miles N. from Aberdeen, where there are some millstone quarries. Pop. 1997.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Aberdour, Fife – Topographical Dictionary 1808

Aberdour, a small town and parish in Fifeshire, Scotland, 10 miles N. W. of Edinburgh; containing 220 houses and 1260 inhabitants. At this place the nuns, called the Poor Clares, had a convent; and here the gallant nobleman, lamented in the Scottish ballad of the “Bonny Earl of Murray,” was murdered in 1592, on suspicion of having gained the affections of the queen.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

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Abdie Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

ABDIE, a parish in the county of Fife, Scotland, in which the battle of Blackearnside was fought in the time of Wallace, between the Scotch and English. Pop. 1381.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

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Abbotshall A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom 1808

Abbotshall, a parish in the district of Kirkaldy, Scotland; containing 368 houses and 2501 inhabitants, 14 miles from Edinburgh.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.

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