Dumfriesshire

Dumfriesshire, a county of Scotland, bounded N. by the county of Lanark, E. by those of Peebles, Selkirk, and Roxburgh, S. by the Solway Firth and Cumberland, and W. by the counties of Kircudbright and Ayr. Desc. A large portion of the County is mountainous, barren, and covered with heath : but in the dales of the Nith, the Annan, and the Esk it is fertile. Rivers. Independent of the Solway Firth, it is watered by the Nith, the Annan, the Esk, and the numerous tributaries of these rivers. There are also several small lakes; and sulphurous and chalybeate springs at Moffat. Pro. The usual crops, and a great many cattle, sheep, and pigs are reared. Minerals. Lead is found in great abundance; coal and lime are also abundant. Manf. The principal are linen, for home consumption; also cotton and carpeting. Area, 702,953 acres, or 1098 square miles. Pop. 75,878.
Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

 

Index of pages for Dumfriesshire

Read Me

Dumfries Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870

Dumfries, a royal and parliamentary borough, market and post town, and parish of Scotland, the county town of Dumfriesshire, on the Nith, over which there are two bridges, 28 miles N.W. from Carlisle. The town consists of several streets, the principal of which runs parallel to the river. There are four episcopal churches, two free churches, and several places of worship for nonconformists, a hospital, infirmary, and lunatic asylum. The other public edifices are a town-house, new county buildings, including gaol and court-house, an academy, theatre, new assembly-rooms, and several associations, with libraries, reading-rooms, a new mechanics’ institute with a fine hall, and an observatory. In the centre of the town is an obelisk erected in honour of Charles, duke of Queensberry. Dumfries is the principal town in the Dumfries district of boroughs, which includes Annan, Kircudbright, Lochmaben, and Sanquhar. Dumfries was exposed to repeated calamities, from the invasions of the English during the border wars. In this town John Comyn, the competitor for the Scottish throne, was stabbed by Robert Bruce in 1305. In the churchyard of St. Michael’s, Robert Burns, the Scottish poet, is buried, and a monument is erected there to his memory. Manf. Woollen fabrics, hosiery, hats, baskets, leather, and shoes. These articles are exported, with freestone, sheep, and grain. Imp. Coal, slate, iron, hemp, wine, and colonial produce. Mar. D. Wed. and Fri. Pop. of town, 12,313; of parl. bor. 14,023. It is a telegraph station, and a station on the Carlisle and Glasgow line of the Glasgow and South-Western Railway, and the Dumfries and Lockerbie branch of the Caledonian Railway.

Source: Beeton’s British Gazetteer 1870. Ward, Lock & Tyler, Paternoster Row, London.

Read Me

Dinwoodie Dumfries 1851

Dinwoodie, an ancient chapelry, in the parish of Applegarth, county of Dumfries, 5 miles (N. by W.) from Lockerbie. It is situated on the road from Lockerbie to Moffat, and a little east of the river Annan, which bounds the parish on the west. On Dinwoodie Green is an inn, which served as a stage to the mail between London and Glasgow, prior to the introduction of railways. The Caledonian railway passes here, and has a station called the Nethercleuch station. Dinwoodie hill, in the neighbourhood of the village, is 736 feet high.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland by Samuel Lewis Second Edition Published London; by S. Lewis and Co., 13, Finsbury Place, South. M. DCCC. LI.

Read Me