Brinkburn Chapelry, Northumberland Family History Guide

Brinkburn Chapelry is an Ancient Parish in the county of Northumberland.

Other places in the parish include: Brinkburn Southside, Brinkburn South Side, Brinkburn Lowward, Brinkburn Low Ward, Brinkburn Highward, and Brinkburn High Ward.

Alternative names: Brinkburn

Parish church:

Parish registers begin:

  • Parish registers: 1656
  • Bishop’s Transcripts: 1765

Nonconformists include:

Adjacent Parishes

  • Longhorsley
  • Rothbury
  • Longframlington
  • Felton

Parish History

Brinkburn

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

BRINKBURN, a parochial chapelry, consisting of the townships of B. South-side, B. Highward, and B. Lowward, in Rothbury district, Northumberland; on the river Coquet, 4½ miles SE by E of Rothbury, and 7 WSW of Acklington r. station. Post Town, Long Framlington, under Morpeth. Acres, 3,378. Real property, £2,154, of which £500 are in iron-works. Pop., 220. Houses, 43. The manor belonged to a priory of Black canons, founded here, in the time of Henry I., by W. de Bertram, Lord of Mitford; was given, at the dissolution of monasteries, to the Earl of Warwick; and passed to the Cadogans. Ruins of the priory, including most of the walls of the church, still exist. The church is transitional-Norman; cruciform, with low square tower; narrow, plain, and gloomy; an interesting relic of the age in which it was built. A branch of Watling-street intersected the chapelry; and traces of a Roman station and bridge can still be seen. Some persons suppose Brinkburn to be the Brunanburch where Athelstane, in 938, defeated the Danes. Coal and lime abound.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Brinkburn High Ward

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1848

BRINKBURN, HIGH WARD, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Long Framlington, union of Rothbury, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 9¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Morpeth; containing 96 inhabitants, and comprising 1894 acres. Brinkburn, including also the Low Ward, was anciently extra-parochial: it stretches about three miles along the north side of the river Coquet, and is crossed by the high road-from Weedon Bridge: the soil is a strong clay. Here are extensive strata of limestone, and a mine of coal. A priory for Augustine canons was founded in the time of Henry I., by Osbertus Colatarius, in honour of St. Peter: the establishment, at the time of the Dissolution, consisted of ten religious, and the revenue was rated at £77. It was beautifully situated within a curvature of the Coquet, which flows close to the walls; and now forms an interesting ruin, exhibiting specimens of Norman architecture. On the hill above the priory are traces of a Roman town, in connexion with a military way; and the foundations of the piers of a Roman bridge are discernible when the water is low.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis 1848

Brinkburn Low Ward

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1848

BRINKBURN, LOW WARD, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Long Framlington, union of Rothbury, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland; containing 57 inhabitants, and comprising 579 acres.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis 1848

Brinkburn South Side

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1848

BRINKBURN, SOUTH SIDE, a township, in the parish of Felton, union of Rothbury, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from Morpeth; containing 55 inhabitants.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis 1848

Administration

  • County: Northumberland
  • Civil Registration District: Rothbury
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of Durham (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Durham
  • Rural Deanery: Alnwick
  • Poor Law Union: Rothbury
  • Hundred: Coquetdale Ward; Morpeth Ward
  • Province: York