Allhallows ln The Wall A Handbook for London 1849

Allhallows In The Wall. A church in Broad-street Ward, built by the younger Dance, in 1765, and so called “of standing close to the wall of the City.” The old church escaped the Fire, but in 1764 had become so dangerously dilapidated, that an Act of Parliament was obtained for its removal, and the present church erected at a cost of 2941l. The first stone was laid 10th July, 1765, and the church consecrated 8th September, 1767. In the chancel is a tablet to the Rev. William Beloe, the translator of Herodotus, and twenty years rector of this parish, (d. 1817). Nares, so well known by his “Glossary,” was his successor in the living, (d. 1829). Over the Communion Table is a copy, by Sir Nathaniel Dance, of Cortona’s picture of “Ananias restoring Paul to sight,” a present from the painter.

Source: A Handbook for London, Past and Present. Peter Cunningham. Published by John Murray 1849.

Saint Albans Wood Street A Handbook for London 1849

Alban’s (Saint), Wood Street. A church in Cripplegate Ward; a piece of Well-proportioned quasi-Gothic, built in the years 1684-5 by Sir Christopher Wren. There is a curious old hour-glass attached to the pulpit. The church described by Stow was taken down in 1632, and the new one built in its stead was burnt in the Great Fire.

Source: A Handbook for London, Past and Present. Peter Cunningham. Published by John Murray 1849.

Adult Orphan Institution St Andrews Place Regents Park A Handbook for London 1849

Adult Orphan Institution, St. Andrew’s Place, Regent’s Park. Instituted 1818, for the relief and education of the friendless and unprovided orphan daughters of clergymen of the Established Church, and of military and naval officers. No girl is admitted under 14 or above 17, and none remain after 19. Annual subscribers of one guinea have one vote.

Source: A Handbook for London, Past and Present. Peter Cunningham. Published by John Murray 1849.

Hampton Court Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

Hampton Court, a seat in Hope-under-Dinmore parish, Hereford; on the river Lugg, 4 ½ miles SSE of Leominster. It belongs to the Coningsbys, and passed to the Earls of Essex. It was originally built by Sir R. Lenthall, who figured at Agincourt; was restored by Campbell; is in the castellated style; forms a quadrangle, with gate-house and two towers on the north side; has a chapel with carved timber roof; contains William III’s bed, some old furniture, and some interesting portraits; and stands in a park of about 8 miles in circuit.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].