The County of Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire is bounded, North by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire, East by Essex, South by Middlesex, and West by Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire. It is about 36 miles long, and 16 broad; and is divided into eight Hundreds — Braughin, Broadwater, Cashio, Dacorum, Edwintree, Hertford, Hitchin and Picton, and Odsey. Rivers: the Lea, the Maran, the Rib, the Quin, the Coln, the Stort, and the Verlam. It has 16 Market-Towns. It is in the Province of Canterbury, in the Dioceses of London and Lincoln; and it is in the Home Circuit. Area 528 square miles, or 337,920 acres. Population, 157,207.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Hertfordshire Towns & Villages

Albury Hertfordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Albury, a parish in the hund. of Edwinstree, union of Bishop-Stortford, county of Hertford; 4¾ miles north-west from Bishop-Stortford. Living, a vicarage, a peculiar of the dean and chapter of St Paul’s; rated at £7 9s. 7d.; gross income £264. Patron, the treasurer of St Paul’s. Charities to the poor amount to about £18 yearly. Pop., in 1801, 557; in 1831, 631. Houses 132. Acres 3,200. A. P. £3,852. Poor rates, in 1837, £386.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Abbots-Langley The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1840

ABBOTS-LANGLEY, a parish within the liberty of St Albans, hund. of Cashio, Watford union, Hertfordshire; 2 miles south-east from King’s Langley, and 3 ¼ from Watford station, on the London and Birmingham railway. Living, a discharged vicarage in the archd. of St Albans and dio. of London; rated at £15; gross income £315. Patron, in 1835, Sir J. Filmer. The church, which has been recently enlarged, contains some handsome monuments. There is a National daily and Sunday school here. Pop., in 1801, 1,205; in 1831, 1,980. The increase of population in this parish is ascribed to the establishment of paper-mills. Houses 371. Acres 5,100. A. P. £8,290. Poor rates, in 1837, £631.— This parish is crossed by the Grand Junction canal, and the London and Birmingham railway. It was the birth place of Nicholas de Breakspear, who was raised to the papal throne, under the title of Adrian IV.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1840.

Abbottslangley A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom 1808

Abbots Langley: The Church of St Lawrence the Martyr
Abbots Langley: The Church of St Lawrence the Martyr (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Abbottslangley, a parish in the hundred of Cashio, Herts, 5 miles from St. Alban’s, 5 from Watford, and 20 from London; containing 222 houses and 1205 inhabitants. It stands near the track of the Grand Junction canal. The church, in the middle of the village, is handsome, and has a neat tower. It is a vicarage, value 15l. formerly belonging to the abbots of St. Alban’s, by a grant from king John, to find them in clothes. This place gave birth to Nicholas Brakespeare, afterwards Pope Adrian IV. the only Englishman who ever attained that dignity.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of the United Kingdom. Benjamin Pitts Capper. 1808.