West Street, Coggeshall, Essex 1911

Coggeshall is an Ancient Parish and a market town in the county of Essex.

Alternative names: Coxall, Great Coggeshall, Little Coggeshall

Parish church: St. Peter

Parish registers begin:

  • Parish registers: 1558
  • Bishop’s Transcripts: 1639; 1800

Nonconformists include: Baptist, Independent/Congregational, Particular Baptist, Society of Friends/Quaker, and Wesleyan Methodist.

Table of Contents

Adjacent Parishes

Parish History

Great Coggeshall

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

COGGESHALL, a town and a sub-district in the district of Witham, Essex. The town is chiefly in Great Coggeshall parish, partly in Little Coggeshall; and stands on the Roman road from Colchester, and on the river Blackwater, 2 ½ miles N by W of Kelvedon r. station, and 6 E by S of Braintree. Its site is partly low ground, partly the acclivity of a pleasant hill. A Roman station, either Ad Ansam or Canonium, is supposed by some antiquaries to have been here; and remains of a Roman villa have been found. A Cistertian abbey was founded in the vicinity, within Little Coggeshall parish, and a three-arched bridge built over an adjacent artificial cut of the Blackwater, by King Stephen; and a small part of the abbey still exists. The town has a post office under Kelvedon, two banking offices, two chief inns, a parish church, five dissenting chapels, a free school, and six alms-houses. The church is perpendicular English, with a tower; and was repaired in 1847, and thoroughly renovated in 1854; and a plan for farther improvement on it, at the cost of about £2,000, was executed in 1864. A weekly market is held on Thursday; and a fair on Whit-Tuesday. There are two silk factories, and a patent isinglass and gelatine factory. Pop., 3,166. Houses, 714. The sub-district contains the two Coggeshall parishes and two others. Acres, 7, 634. Pop., 4,954. Houses, 1,083.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1848

COGGESHALL, GREAT (St. Peter), a market town and parish, in the union of Witham, Witham division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 3 miles (N.) from Kelvedon, and 44 (N. E.) from London; containing 3408 inhabitants, of whom 443 are in the hamlet of Little Coggeshall. This place is supposed by some to have been the Roman station Ad Ansam, and by others the Canonium of Antoninus, with the distance of which latter from Cæsaromagus its situation precisely corresponds: numerous vestiges of Roman antiquity have been discovered. The present town appears to have risen from the establishment of an abbey in 1142, by King Stephen and his Queen Matilda, for monks of the Cistercian order, and in honour of the Blessed Virgin; to the abbot and monks of which King John granted several privileges, including, probably, the power of life and death, as is inferred from the ancient name of one of the streets, still by some called Gallows-street. Henry III. granted them free warren, a weekly market, and an annual fair for eight days. The revenue of the abbey at the Dissolution was £298. 8.: the remains, which exhibit specimens of early English architecture, are now occupied as a farmhouse; the exterior has lancet-shaped windows in good preservation, and in the interior are some good windows and vaulted and groined roofs. Near the abbey is an ancient bridge of three arches, built by Stephen, over a canal cut for conveying water from the river to the monastery.

The town is situated near the river Blackwater, from which it rises gradually to a considerable elevation, and consists of several narrow streets; it was first lighted with gas in 1837, and the inhabitants are amply supplied with water from springs in the neighbourhood. The manufacture of baize and serge, formerly extensive, is now extinct; the principal branch of trade is silkweaving, which has been established within the last 30 years. In 1838, Mr. John Hall erected a silk-throwing mill, capable of employing 500 persons, and Messrs. Westmacott and Co. have 100 looms at work weaving broad silks and velvets; in 1826, Mr. Bankes commenced the tambour-work on lace-net, in which about 300 females are engaged, and in 1838 introduced a number of machines for weaving lace-net. An extensive iron-foundry and steam flour-mill have been erected by Charles Newman, Esq. The place is noted for its vegetables and garden-seeds. The market is on Thursday: the market-place is spacious, and contained an old cross, which was taken down in 1787. A fair for cattle and pedlery is held on Whit-Tuesday.

Coggeshall anciently comprised the parishes of Great and Little Coggeshall, at present consolidated: in the latter were two churches, built by the monks; one for their own use, which has been entirely demolished, and the other for a parochial church, the remains whereof have been converted into a barn. The parish comprises by computation 2300 acres, 300 of which are woodland; the soil is various, in some parts a strong loam resting on a clay bottom, in others a stiff wet loam on a whitish marl, and in the neighbourhood of the town a rich deep loam of great fertility. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king’s books at £11. 3. 4.; net income, £215; patron, Peter Du Cane, Esq., lord of the manor; impropriators, Charles Skingley, Esq., and Mrs. Caswell. The church is a spacious handsome structure in the later English style, with a large tower; the aisles are embattled, and strengthened with empanelled buttresses: the interior contains several ancient monuments. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, Independents, and Wesleyans. A school, under the direction of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, was founded in 1636, by Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., who bequeathed land producing £300 per annum. Silver and copper coins of Ethelwulph, and a massive gold ring, have been dug up on the Highfields estate.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis 1848

Little Coggeshall

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

COGGESHALL (Little), a parish in Witham district, Essex; containing a small part of the town of Coggeshall. Acres, 830. Real property, £3,597. Pop., 429. Houses, 85. The living is incorporated with Great Coggeshall. There were once two churches, the one monastic and long ago demolished, the other parochial and now partially restored.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Parish Records

Search Results for FamilySearch Catalog – Great Coggeshall

England, Essex, Great Coggeshall – Biography ( 1 )
A history of Coggeshall, in Essex : with an account of its church, abbey, manors, ancient houses, &c. and biographical sketches of its most distinguished men and ancient families, including the family of Coggeshall from 1149, to the re-union at Rhode Island, U.S.A., in 1884
Author: Beaumont, George Frederick

England, Essex, Great Coggeshall – Census ( 1 )
Census returns for Great Coggeshall, 1841-1891
Author: Great Britain. Census Office

England, Essex, Great Coggeshall – Church records ( 4 )
Births, baptisms and burials, 1752-1837
Author: Stoneham Street Chapel (Great Coggesshall, Essex : Indepeendent)

Bishop’s transcripts for Great Coggeshall, 1639-1640
Author: Church of England. Parish Church of Great Coggeshall (Essex)

Bishop’s transcripts for Great Coggeshall, 1800-1863
Author: Church of England. Parish Church of Great Coggeshall (Essex)

Parish registers for Great Coggeshall, 1558-1986
Author: Church of England. Parish Church of Great Coggeshall (Essex)

England, Essex, Great Coggeshall – Church records – Indexes ( 3 )
Computer printout of Great Coggeshall, Independent, Essex, Eng

Parish register printouts of Great Coggeshall, Essex, England (Independent Church) ; christenings, 1752-1776
Author: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Department

Parish register printouts of Great Coggeshall, Essex, England (Independent) ; christenings, 1773-1837
Author: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Department

England, Essex, Great Coggeshall – History ( 1 )
A history of Coggeshall, in Essex : with an account of its church, abbey, manors, ancient houses, &c. and biographical sketches of its most distinguished men and ancient families, including the family of Coggeshall from 1149, to the re-union at Rhode Island, U.S.A., in 1884
Author: Beaumont, George Frederick

England, Essex, Great Coggeshall – Probate records ( 1 )
Extracts of wills in the archdeaconry of Colchester for all persons listed as being from Coggeshall, Essex, Great and Little 1782-1857
Author: Bryson, Maureen Smith

View Records

Bankrupts

Below is a list of people that were declared bankrupt between 1820 and 1843 extracted from The Bankrupt Directory; George Elwick; London; Simpkin, Marshall and Co.; 1843.

Brightwen Isaac; Robert Brightwen; and Isaac Brightwen, jun.; Coggeshall,
Essex, brewers, May 27, 1828.

Pryke Peter, Great Coggeshall, Essex, tailor and draper, Oct. 19, 1830.

Directories

Poll Books

Maps

Vision of Britain historical maps

Administration

  • County: Essex
  • Civil Registration District: Witham
  • Probate Court: Court of the Archdeaconry of Colchester
  • Diocese: Pre-1846 – London, Post-1845 – Rochester
  • Rural Deanery: For Little Coggeshall – Pre-1847 – Bocking, Post-1846 – Coggeshall
  • Poor Law Union: Witham
  • Hundred: Lexden
  • Province: Canterbury

Similar Posts