Greystoke is an Ancient Parish in the county of Cumberland.

The parish contains also the townships of Little Blencow, Johnby, Motherby and Gill, Hutton Soil, Hutton John, Mungrisdale, Bowscale, Hutton Roof, and Berrier and Murrah, and the chapelries of Watermillock, Matterdale, and Threlkeld.

Alternative names: Greystock

Parish church: St. Andrew

Parish registers begin: 1559

Nonconformists include: Roman Catholic, United Presbyterian Church of Scotland, and Wesleyan Methodist.

Table of Contents

Adjacent Parishes

Parish History

Greystoke

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

GREYSTOKE, a village, a township, a parish, and a sub-district, in Penrith district, Cumberland. The village stands near the Blencow station of the Penrith and Cockermouth railway, 5 miles W by N of Penrith; was once a market town; and has a post office under Penrith.

The township includes the village, and comprises 4,538 acres. Real property, £2,957. Pop., 327. Houses, 77.

The parish contains also the townships of Little Blencow, Johnby, Motherby and Gill, Hutton Soil, Hutton John, Mungrisdale, Bowscale, Hutton Roof, and Berrier and Murrah, and the chapelries of Watermillock, Matterdale, and Threlkeld. Acres, 48,960; of which 1,020 are water. Real property, £20,581. Pop. in 1851, 3,056; in 1861, 2,885. Houses, 562. The surface extends southward to Ulleswater, and westward to the Skiddaw minntains; has much diversity of contour; and includes many picturesque spots of the Lake country. The property, in most parts, is much subdivided.

The manor belonged to the late Duke of Norfolk, and passed to Henry Howard, Esq. An ancient castle, within Greystoke park, adjacent to the NW side of the village, was built in 1353, by the Greystoke family; passed first to the Dacres, next to the Dukes of Norfolk; was garrisoned for Charles I. in 1648, and captured and dismantled by a parliamentarian force; and is now represented by only some ruined towers.

A mansion in lieu of it, and called Greystoke Castle, was built about the middle of the 17th century; stands on an eminence breaking abruptly down, on one side, to a headstream of the river Petterill; was originally more spacious than elegant, but has undergone great, recent, ornamental improvement; commands, from its windows, fine views of the Lake mountains; and contains many interesting pictures and objects of curiosity. The grounds connected with it comprise about 5,000 acres; are tastefully disposed; and include a well stocked deer park.

Coal, slate, and lime abound; and there is a lead mine, with silver. A Roman camp is at Redstone; and a Druidical circle is at Motherby.

The living is a rectory in the diocese of Carlisle. Value, not reported. Patron, H. W. Askew, Esq. The church is ancient and cruciform; has a tower and a fine E window; and was formerly collegiate.

The chapelries of Matterdale, Mungrisdale, Threlkeld, and Watermillock are separate benefices. Charities, £90.

The sub-district includes also three other parishes, and parts of two others. Acres, 67,536. Pop., 4,975. Houses, 993.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1848

GREYSTOCK (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 11 miles (W. by N.) from Penrith; comprising the townships of Berrier with Murrah, Little Blencow, Bowscale, Greystock, Hutton-John, Hutton-Roof, Hutton-Soil, Johnby, Matterdale, Motherby with Gill, Mungrisdale, Threlkeld, and Water-Millock; and containing 2786 inhabitants, of whom 364 are in the township of Greystock.

This place belonged soon after the Conquest to Lyolf, whose descendants assumed the name of the estate. Thomas de Greystock obtained from Henry III. the grant of a weekly market and an annual fair, both of which have been long since discontinued. During the war in the reign of Charles I., the ancient baronial castle was garrisoned for the king, but being besieged by a detachment of the army under General Lambert, surrendered, in 1648, and was soon afterwards demolished by order of the parliament: some of the ruined towers only are at present remaining, near the site of the modern castle, erected about the year 1670.

The parish comprises a tract of rich and fertile land, extending ten miles in length and eight in average breadth, and abounding in richly diversified scenery. The soil is generally a red loam, alternated with gravel, and the substratum abounds with coal and limestone; there are also some quarries of good slate.

The present castle, erected by the Hon. Charles Howard, and greatly improved by the late Duke of Norfolk, is a magnificent structure, containing several stately apartments, and a large collection of paintings; the grounds are beautifully laid out, and embellished with artificial waterfalls.

The village is situated near the source of the river Petterill, and the neighbourhood abounds with various kinds of game.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king’s books at £40. 7. 8½.; patron, Adam Askew, Esq. The church was in 1382 made collegiate by Neville, Archbishop of York, for a prior and six canons, whose stalls are yet remaining, though their chantries have been demolished; it is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, and near the altar is a table-monument of alabaster, with effigies of two of the barons of Greystock, in armour, under highly-enriched canopies of alabaster.

There are chapels at Matterdale, Mungrisdale, Water-Millock, and Threlkeld.

In the parish are vestiges of a Roman intrenchment, called Redstone Camp, near which have been found urns, stone coffins, and human bones; leading from it in a direction towards Ambleside, are traces of an ancient road, and in the same tract lie three large cairns. In the vicinity of Motherby is a circle of stones, seventeen yards in diameter, within the area of which heaps of bones have been discovered.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis 1848

Murrah

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales Circa 1870

MURRAH, a hamlet in Greystoke parish, Cumberland; 1 mile NE of Mungrisdale.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Parish Records

FamilySearch

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Census ( 1 )
Census returns for Greystoke, Johnby, Little Blencow, Motherby and Gill, 1841-1891
Author: Great Britain. Census Office

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Census – 1851 ( 1 )
1851 census, parish of Hutton, parish of Greystoke
Author: Russell, M. M., Mrs.

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Census – 1851 – Indexes ( 1 )
1851 census index, Greystoke : HO 107/2426

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Church history ( 2 )
Greystoke parish church : past and present
Author: Rice, H. A. L.

Matterdale Church, Cumberland : quatercentenary, 1573-1973

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Church records ( 17 )
Bishop’s transcripts for Greystoke, 1666-1875
Author: Church of England. Parish Church of Greystoke (Cumberland)

Bishop’s transcripts for Matterdale, 1721-1886
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Matterdale (Cumberland)

Bishop’s transcripts for Mungrisdale, 1742-1875
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Mungrisdale (Cumberland)

Bishop’s transcripts Threlkeld, 1645-1875
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Threlkeld (Cumberland)

Church records, 1774-1919
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Threlkeld (Cumberland)

Church records, 1847-1939
Author: Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Matterdale, Cumberland)

Church records, 1865-1915
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Matterdale (Cumberland)

Church records, 1887-1941
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Mungrisdale (Cumberland)

Parish registers for Greystoke, 1559-1941
Author: Church of England. Parish Church of Greystoke (Cumberland)

Parish registers for Matterdale, 1634-1923
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Matterdale (Cumberland)

Parish registers for Mungrisdale, 1742-1969
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Mungrisdale (Cumberland)

Parish registers for Threlkeld, 1573-1977
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Threlkeld (Cumberland)

The registers of Matterdale Church, 1654-1720
Author: Brierley, Henry, 1846-1933; Church of England. Chapelry of Matterdale (Cumberland)

The registers of the Parish of Greystoke in the county of Cumberland : baptisms, marriages and burials, 1559-1757
Author: Maclean, Allan M.; Church of England. Parish Church of Greystoke (Cumberland)

The registers of the parish of Watermillock in the county of Cumberland : baptisms, burials and marriages, 1579-1812
Author: Maclean, Hector; Church of England. Chapelry of Watermillock (Cumberland)

[Transcript of marriages, 1559-1812, from the bishop’s transcripts for the parish of Greystoke]
Author: Church of England. Parish Church of Greystoke (Cumberland)

[Transcript of marriages, 1573-1812, from the bishop’s transcript for the chapelry of Threlkeld, Cumberland]
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Threlkeld (Cumberland)

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Church records – Indexes ( 4 )
Computer printout of Greystoke, Cumb., Eng

Computer printout of Matterdale, Cumb., Eng

Computer printout of Mungrisdale, Cumb., Eng

Computer printout of Threlkeld, Cumb., Eng

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Occupations ( 1 )
Parish records, 1726-1922
Author: Greystoke (Cumberland)

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Poorhouses, poor law, etc. ( 2 )
Church records, 1774-1919
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Threlkeld (Cumberland)

Parish records, 1726-1922
Author: Greystoke (Cumberland)

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Public records ( 2 )
Church records, 1865-1915
Author: Church of England. Chapelry of Matterdale (Cumberland)

Parish records, 1726-1922
Author: Greystoke (Cumberland)

England, Cumberland, Greystoke – Taxation ( 1 )
Parish records, 1726-1922
Author: Greystoke (Cumberland)

Administration

  • County: Cumberland
  • Civil Registration District: Penrith
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop of Carlisle (Episcopal Consistory)
  • Diocese: Carlisle
  • Rural Deanery: Allerdale
  • Poor Law Union: Penrith
  • Hundred: Leath Ward
  • Province: York

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