Redruth Cornwall Family History Guide

Redruth is an Ancient Parish and a market town in the county of Cornwall.

Other places in the parish include: Carnmarth, Euny Redruth, Little Redruth, and Plengwary.

Alternative names:

Parish church:

Parish registers begin:

  • Parish registers: 1560
  • Bishop’s Transcripts: 1614

Nonconformists include: Baptist, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Irvingite/Catholic Apostolic Church, Presbyterian, Primitive Methodist, Society of Friends/Quaker, Wesleyan Methodist, Wesleyan Methodist Association, and Wesleyan Methodist Reform.

Adjacent Parishes

Parish History

The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales 1870

REDRUTH, a town, a parish, a sub-district, and a district, in Cornwall. The town stands on the West Cornwall railway, at the junction of the line to Perran-Arworthal, 9½ miles SW of Truro; is conjectured, by some antiquaries, to be one of the most ancient towns in England, and to have been originally called Tre-Druith, signifying “Druids,-town;” is believed, by less sanguine writers, not to have originated till after the division of the county into parishes; was for some time called, and is still occasionally called, St. Uny; appears to have been built around a chapel dedicated to that saint; seems to have acquired its present name, by a corruption of Tretrot, signifying “the house on the river’s bed;” is situated chiefly on the side of a hill, rising to the altitude of 414 feet, amid a dreary tract of country, bare of vegetation and strewn with rubbish, but remarkably rich in mineral produce; consists chiefly of one long street, well built, but insufficiently supplied with water; carries on extensive trade in connexion with neighbouring mines often iron and copper; is a seat of county courts, and a polling-place; and has a head post-office, a railway station with telegraph, a banking office, two chief inns, a town hall built in 1850, public rooms built in 1861, a market-place with a clock-tower at the entrance, a theatre, a literary institution, a church, six dissenting chapels, national schools, an extensive brewery, a safety fuse manufactory, and an iron-foundry. The railway station is on the hill; and the railway, in its neighbourhood, passes along a lofty viaduct. The public rooms were erected at a cost of £2,000. The church stands about a mile distant, under Carnbrea hill; is a modern edifice, with a tower; and contains a monument, by Chantrey, to W. Davey, Esq. Markets are held on Tuesday and Friday; and fairs, on 25 March, 2 May, 3 Aug., and 12 Oct. Pop. in 1851, 7,095; in 1861, 7, 919. Houses, 1,445.

The parish contains also the hamlets of Little Redruth, or Plengwary, and Treleigh; and comprises 3,907 acres. Real property, £45,357; of which £11,742 are in mines, £40 in quarries, £58 in iron-works, £455 in railways, and £83 in gas-works. Pop. in 1851, 10,571; in 1861, 11,504. Houses, 2,159. The mines are chief objects of interest. The Dunstanville pillar is on Carnbrea hill; antiquities of the kind called Druidical, are in various parts, but have been much damaged or destroyed; and a stone circle, now demolished, gave name to Plengwary. The living is a rectory in the diocese of Exeter. Value, £432. Patron, I. F. Basset, Esq. The p. curacy of Treleigh is a separate benefice. Dr. Pryce, the antiquary, was a native. The sub-district is conterminate with the parish. The district comprehends also the sub-district of Illogan, conterminate with Illogan parish; the sub-district of Camborne, conterminate with Camborne parish; the sub-district of Gwennap, containing the parishes of Gwennap and St. Stithians; and the sub-district of Phillack, containing the parishes of Phillack, Gwithian, and Gwinear. Acres, 40,305. Poor-rates in 1863, £10,537. Pop. in 1851, 53,628; in 1861, 57,173. Houses, 11,192. Marriages in 1863, 539; births, 2,194, of which 106 were illegitimate; deaths, 1,640, of which 890 were at ages under 5 years, and 24 at ages above 85. Marriages in the ten years 1851-60, 4,921; births, 18,970; deaths, 11,728. The places of worship, in 1851, were 19 of the Church of England, with 8,713 sittings; 2 of Baptists, with 542 s.; 4 of Quakers, with 530 s.; 54 of Wesleyans, with 18,144 s.; 8 of Primitive Methodists, with 1,780 s.; 7 of Bible Christians, with 2,117 s.; 8 of the Wesleyan Association, with 2,486 s.; and 5 of Wesleyan Reformers, with 880 s. The schools were 21 public day schools, with 2,080 scholars; 103 private day schools, with 2,764 s.; 79 Sunday schools, with 12,337 s.; and 3 evening schools for adults, with 52 s. The workhouse is in Illogam, and has accommodation for 450 inmates.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of England & Wales [Wilson, John M]. A. Fullarton & Co. N. d. c. [1870-72].

Bankrupts

People made bankrupt and the date of bankruptcy.

Bray Walter, Redruth. Cornwall, saddler, Aug. 31, 1827.

Honey John, Redruth, Cornwall, linen draper, Aug. 11, 1837.

Nicholl Thomas, jun., Redruth, Cornwall. grocer, Nov. 26, 1839.

Rabey William, Redruth. Cornwall, leather seller & ironmonger, Sept. 6, 1839.

Skelton Douglas, Redruth, Cornwall, money scrivener, March 24, 1829.

Teague Mary, widow, Redruth, Cornwall, grocer and flour seller, May 12, 1829.

Teague William, Redruth, Cornwall, merchant, Jan. 16, 1827.

The London Gazette 1851

WHEREAS a Petition of Edwin Wales of the town of Redruth in the county of Cornwall Mason and Grocer an insolvent debtor having been filed in the County Court of Cornwall at Redruth and an interim order for protection from process having been given to the said Edwin Wales, under the provisions of the Statutes in that case made and provided, the said Edwin Wales is hereby required to appear before the said Court on the 13th day of March next, at eleven o clock in the forenoon precisely for his first examination touching his debts, estate, and effects, and to be further dealt with according to the provisions of the said Statutes; and the choice of the creditors assignees is to take place at the time so appointed. All persons indebted to the said Edwin Wales or that have any of his effects are not to pay or deliver the same but to Mr F Paynter Clerk of the said Court at his office at Redruth the Official Assignee of the estate and effects of the said insolvent. 

In the Matter of Cecilia Frances Chadwick of the town of Redruth in the county of Cornwall Widow an Insolvent Debtor. THE creditors of the above named Cecilia Frances Chadwick are desired to meet the assignees of the estate and effects of the said insolvent on Saturday, the 12th day of April next, at the hour of two o clock in the afternoon, at Andrews Hotel in Redruth aforesaid, for the purpose of assenting to or dissenting from the said assignees discontinuing a certain policy of insurance effected in the year 1848 in the Asylum Insurance Office on the life of the said insolvent for five years and on other special affairs. Dated 19th March 1851 

Parish Records

Parish Registers

Redruth Parish Registers 1560 to 1716 - View and Download Free

Maps

Vision of Britain historical maps

Administration

  • County: Cornwall
  • Civil Registration District: Redruth
  • Probate Court: Court of the Bishop (Consistory) of the Archdeaconry of Cornwall
  • Diocese: Exeter
  • Rural Deanery: Penwith
  • Poor Law Union: Redruth
  • Hundred: Penwith
  • Province: Canterbury