The County of Cornwall

Cornwall is the South-Western extremity of England, and is bounded by the Sea on all sides, except the East, where it joins Devonshire. It is 90 miles long and from 25 to 7 miles broad. It is divided into nine hundreds: East, Keriar, Lesnewth, Penwith, Powder, Pyder, Stratton, Trigg and West. Rivers: the Tamar, the Cober, the Fall and the Camel. Its principal Towns are Launceston and Falmouth. The county contains 1327 square miles, or 849,280 acres. Cornwall is in the Province of Canterbury, and in the Diocese of Exeter. Population, 341,279.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850.

Cornwall Towns & Villages

Warwick Guy – Endellion Cornwall – London Gazette 1850

Last updated on April 20th, 2017

Pursuant to the Acts for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in England.

The following PRISONERS, whose Estates and Effects have been vested in the Provisional Assignee by Order of the Court for Relief of Insolvent Debtors, and whose Petitions and Schedules, duly filed, have been severally referred and transmitted to the County Courts hereinafter mentioned, pursuant to the Statute in that behalf, are ordered to be brought up before the Judges of the said Courts respectively, as herein set forth, to be dealt with according to Law :

Before the Judge of the County Court of Cornwall, holden at Bodmin, on Wednesday the 8th day of May 1850, at Ten o’Clock in the Forenoon precisely.

Warwick Guy, late of the parish of Endellion, in the county of Cornwall, Farmer, previously of the same place and occupation, and formerly. of the same place and occupation.

St. Agnes Cornwall The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851.

Last updated on February 18th, 2017

Looking up Town Hill to the Church and St Agnes Hotel.
Looking up Town Hill to the Church and St Agnes Hotel. Now often described as “Picturesque”, St Agnes is a large village which was a centre of mining activity in the 19th Century, a truly industrial place.

Agnes (St), a parochial chapelry and market-town, situated on the Bristol channel, in the hund. of Pyder, union of Truro, western division of the county of Cornwall; 9 miles north-west of Truro. Living, a curacy subordinate to the vicarage of Perran in Sabulo, in the archd. of Cornwall and dio. of Exeter; rated at £33. Patron, the dean and chapter of Exeter. Church dedicated to St Agnes, and built about 1482. There is a free school here; also a British school with 500 scholars, and places of worship for the Congregationalists, and Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists. Continue reading “St. Agnes Cornwall The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851.”

Advent Cornwall The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

The Church at Advent, dedicated to Saint Adwen...
The Church at Advent, dedicated to Saint Adwena. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

ADVENT, or St. Adven, formerly a chapelry in the parish of Lanteglos, now a distinct parish in the hund. of Lesnewth, Camelford union, Cornwall; 2 miles south from Camelford. Living, subordinate to the rectory of Lanteglos, in the archd. of Cornwall and dio. of Exeter. A copper-mine is wrought here. Pop., in 1801, 170; in 1831, 244. Houses 50. Acres 4,020. A. P. £1,396. Poor rates, in 1837, £110.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Falmouth Cornwall Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland Gorton 1833

Falmouth harbour
Falmouth harbour (Photo credit: Skinnyde)

FALMOUTH, co. Cornwall.

London 269 m. WSW. Launceston 60 m. SW. Lat. 50. 8N. Long. 5. 3 W.

Pop. 6374. M. D. Thurs. Fairs, Aug. 7; and Oct. 10, for cattle.

A market and sea-port town, having separate jurisdiction, locally situated in the hundred of Kerrier. This town is seated at the bottom of an eminence commanding the harbour, at the mouth of the river Fal, near the English Channel; the houses are principally arranged in one street, which extends along the beach for nearly a mile. The quay here is very convenient, as the water is of sufficient depth to admit vessels of large burden to land their goods upon the wharf. The harbour is very capacious, and affords excellent security for ships, being well screened by the surrounding high lands. Near the middle of the entrance is a large rock, called the Black Rock, supposed to have been anciently the island where the Phoenicians used to traffic with the natives for tin.  Continue reading “Falmouth Cornwall Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland Gorton 1833”