The County of Berkshire


Berkshire is bounded north by Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire being separated from them by the Thames; east by Surrey; South by Hampshire; West and Northwest by Wiltshire and Gloucestershire. It is about 40 miles long and 30 broad, containing 756 square miles, and 483,840 statute acres. Rivers, the Thames, the Kennett, the Loddon, the Ock, and the Lambourn. Berkshire is in the Province of Canterbury; in the diocese of Salisbury; and in the Oxford circuit. It is divided into 20 hundreds, named as follows: Beynhurst, Bray, Charlton, Compton, Cookham, Faircross, Faringdon,Ganfield, Hormer, Kintbury-Eagle, Lambourn, Moreton, Ock, Reading, Ripplesmere, Shrivenham, Sonning, Theasle, Wantage, Wargrave. There are 148 parishes, and 12 market-towns. Population, 161,147.

Source: Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850

Berkshire Towns & Villages

Abingdon Poor Law Union Berkshire


Last updated on March 22nd, 2017

Abingdon Union. (Formed 1 Jan. 1835 by Order dated 6 Dec. 1834.— Places marked thus * added 6 Oct. 1835 by Orders dated 12 Sept. 1835, as amended by Order dated 25 April 1836, and thus † added 29 Sept. 1858 by Order dated 19 July 1858).

The Abingdon poor-law union embraces a district of 77 square miles, containing 38 parishes, with a population, in 1831, of 16,674. The average annual expenditure for the poor in this district during the three years preceding the union, was £14,467; expenditure, in 1838, £8,335. A work-house has lately been erected at Abingdon for this union, at an expense of about £8,5001.

The Abingdon Union House is a large building, in the form of the letter Y2Continue reading “Abingdon Poor Law Union Berkshire”

Berkshire County

Members of Parliament

Members of Parliament for 1869

Lieut.-Col. Robert Loyd Lindsay, v.c, Lockinge House, Wantage, and 2 Carlton-gardens, London s.w.;

John Walter, Esq., Bearwood, Wokingham, and 40 Upper Grosvenor-street, London w.;

Richard Benyon, Esq., Englefleld House, Reading, and 17 Grosvenor-square, London W.

Hospitals and Asylums

Royal Berkshire Hospital, London-road, Reading, — Her Majesty the Queen, patroness; Rev. George Bishop, chaplain; Owen Evans, house surgeon; D. B. Skey, secretary and house steward; Miss Ellen Smith, superintendent.

The Counties Lunatic Asylum (Oxford and Berks) is situated at Littlemore, Oxfordshire. R. H. H. Sankey, resident medical superintendent; J. M. Davenport, Esq., clerk to committee; Rev. Samuel Paris Hill, B.A. chaplain; Joseph John Andrews, steward and clerk.

Law and Legislation

Coroners

Coroners for the County (1869) — A. D. Bartlett, Abingdon (Abingdon district); J. Alexander, Newbury (Newbury district); R. Clarke, Reading (Reading district); W. Wasbrough, Wantage (Wantage district).

Police

The county police force consists of a chief constable, 8 superintendents, 2 inspectors, 12 sergeants and 91 constables — total, 114. Colonel Adam Blandy, of Reading, is the chief constable, and William Grant is the chief clerk and superintendent; the head quarters are at Reading, and the County Police Station is in the Forbury, Reading; the reserve force of the county is also stationed at Reading.

Gaols

There are two county gaols, one at Abingdon and the other at Reading. The County Gaol in Bridge-street, Abingdon, is a plain stone building, erected in 1811, at an expense of £26,000: it includes a chapel and court house: it is now unoccupied. The County Gaol, Forbury, Reading, is a red brick castellated building with white stone dressings; Samuel Ferry, governor.

Rivers

The Blackwater rises near Aldershot, and bounds the county on the south from Blackwater to Swallowfield, whence it falls into the Loddon; the Broadwater and Bull Brook rise near Swinley, and, uniting their streams at Warfield, fall into the Loddon under the former name at Twyford; Cole; Emme, rises near Bagshot, and falls into the Loddon at Sandford Mill; Enbourn, rises near Inkpen, and falls into the Kennet below Wasing; Isis; “the Kennet swift, for silver eels renown’d,” enters at Hungerford, and joins the Thames by Reading; Lambourn, rises near the town of that name, and after a course of eleven miles falls into the Thames at Abingdon; “the Loddon slow, with verdant alders crown’d,” and the subject of Pope’s fable of Lodona, enters at Swallowfield, and falls into the Thames near Wingrave; Ock, rises in the vale of the White Horse, near Kingston Lisle, and unites with the Thames at Abingdon; Shaffield Moor Brook, runs from the chalk near White Waltham, and falls into the Thames near Monkey Island; the Thames, “Though deep yet clear; though gentle, yet not dull; Strong without rage; without o’erflowiog full,” enters near Lechdale; and a stream which rises at Ginge, and falls into the Thames at Button Courtney.

Inland Navigation

Kennet and Avon Canal, from Hungerford to Newbury, act passed in 1794, opened 1798; Kennet river; Thames river, its entire course; Thames and Isis canal; Wilts and Berks canal, from Bath in Somersetshire to the Thames at Abingdon, undertaken in 1793, opened 1810.

Produce

Sheep, for which there is a great market at East Ilsley; swine, of which 4,000 are annually slaughtered at Farringdon for London; horses, at Abingdon and Farringdon. Barley; wheat; oak, beach, and fir trees. Peat, at Newbury.

Manufactures

Malt is made in great quantities. Abingdon, hemp-dressing; sacking; and coarse weather-proof coats. Greenham Mills near Thatcham, blankets. Newbury, serge, shalloon, paper, and cotton. Reading, pins, sacking, and ribbons. Temple Mills, Bisham, copper utensils. Wokingham, silk, gauze, and shoes.

Population in 1821

Hundreds, 20; Boroughs, 4; Market Towns, 8; Parishes, 147; Parts of Parishes, 6; Divisions, 6; Liberties, 11.

Houses, 25,481.

Inhabitants. Males, 65,546; Females, 66,431; total, 131,977. By the census of 1831, 145,289.

Families. Employed in Agriculture, 14,769; in Trade, 8,773; in neither, 4,158; total, 27,700.

Baptisms in 1820. Males, 2,088; Females, 1,943; total, 4,031. Annual average of 1811 to 1820, 3,884.

Marriages, 1,002. Annual Average, 930.

Burials. Males, 1,211: Females, 1,216: total, 2,427. Annual Average, 2,306.

Sources 

  • Leonard’s Gazetteer of England and Wales; Second Edition; C. W. Leonard, London; 1850
  • Post Office Directory of Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire and Oxfordshire; E. R. Kelly; Kelly & Co., London. 1869.
  • The Family Topographer; Samuel Tymms; 1834.

Berkshire Parishes

A

  • Abingdon
    • St. Helen
    • St. Nicholas
  • Aldermaston
  • Aldworth
  • Appleford
  • Appleton
  • Arborfield
  • Ardington
  • Ascot
  • Ashampstead
  • Ashbury
  • Aston Tirrold
  • Avington

B

  • Bagley Wood (ex. par.)
  • Barkham
  • Basildon
  • Baulking
  • Beedon
  • Beenham or Beenham Vallence
  • Besselsleigh
  • Binfield
  • Bisham
  • Blewbury
  • Boxford
  • Bradfield
  • Bray
  • Bright Waltham or Brightwalton
  • Brightwell
  • Brimpton
  • Buckland
  • Bucklebury
  • Burghfield
  • Buscot

C

  • Catmore
  • Chaddleworth
  • Chandling’s Farm
  • Charney Bassett
  • Chawley
  • Chieveley
  • Childrey
  • Chilton
  • Chilton Foliat
  • Cholsey
  • Clewer
  • Coleshill
  • Compton
  • Compton Beauchamp
  • Cookham
  • Cumnor

D

  • Denchworth
  • Didcot or Dudcote
  • Drayton

E

  • East and West Lockinge
  • East Challow
  • East Garston
  • East Hagbourne
  • East Hendred
  • East Ilsley
  • East Lockinge
  • East Shefford
  • Easthampstead
  • Eaton Hastings
  • Enborne
  • Englefield

F

  • Faringdon
  • Farnborough
  • Fawley
  • Finchampstead
  • Frilford
  • Frilsham
  • Fyfield, Berkshire

G

  • Garford
  • Goosey
  • Great Coxwell
  • Great Faringdon
  • Great Shefford
  • Greenham
  • Grove

H

  • Hampstead Marshall
  • Hampstead Norris or Hamstead Norreys
  • Hanney
  • Harwell
  • Hatford
  • Hinton Waldrist or Hinton Waldridge
  • Hungerford
  • Hurley
  • Hurst

I

  • Inkpen

K

  • Kennington
  • Kingston Bagpuize
  • Kingston Lisle
  • Kintbury

L

  • Lambourn
  • Langford
  • Leckhampstead
  • Letcombe Bassett
  • Letcombe Regis
  • Little Coxwell
  • Little Wittenham
  • Longcot and Fernham
  • Long Wittenham
  • Longworth
  • Lyford

M

  • Maidenhead
  • Marcham
  • Midgham
  • Milton
  • Moulsford

N

  • Newbury
    • St. Nicholas
  • New Windsor
    • Chapel Royal
    • St. George’s
  • North Hinksey
  • North Moreton

O

  • Oakingham
  • Old Winsor
  • Oxford (part of St. Aldate)

P

  • Padworth
  • Pangbourn
  • Peasemore
  • Purley
  • Pusey

R

  • Radley
  • Reading
    • St. Giles
    • St. Laurence
    • St. Mary
  • Remenham
  • Ruscombe

S

  • Sandford
  • Sandhurst
  • Sandleford
  • Shalbourne
  • Shaw cum Donnington
  • Shellingford or Shillingford
  • Shilton
  • Shinfield
  • Shippon
  • Shottesbrook
  • Shrivenham
  • Sonning
  • Sotwell
  • South Hinksey
  • South Moreton
  • Sparsholt
  • Speen
  • Stanford Dingley
  • Stanford-in-the-Vale
  • Steventon
  • Stratfield Mortimer
  • Strathfield Saye
  • Streatley, Berkshire
  • Sulham
  • Sulhampstead Abbots
  • Sulhampstead Bannister
  • Sunninghill
  • Sunningwell
  • Sutton Courtney
  • Swallowfield

T

  • Thatcham
  • Tidmarsh
  • Tilehurst
  • Tubney
  • Twyford

U

  • Uffington
  • Ufton Nervet or Ufton
  • Upper Lambourn
  • Upton, Berkshire

W

  • Wallingford
    • All Hallows
    • St. Leonard
    • St. Mary
    • St. Peter
  • Waltham St. Lawrence
  • Wantage
  • Warfield
  • Wargrave
  • Wasing
  • Watchfield
  • Welford
  • West Challow
  • West Hanney
  • West Hendred
  • West Ilsley
  • West Shefford
  • West Woodhay
  • White Waltham
  • Wickham and Hoe Benham
  • Winkfield with Ascot
  • Winterbourn
  • Wokingham
  • Woolhampton
  • Woolstone
  • Wootton
  • Wytham

Y

  • Yattendon

Poor Law Unions

  • Berkshire Poor Law Unions
  • Abingdon Poor Law Union
  • Bradfield Poor Law Union
  • Cookham Poor Law Union
  • Easthampstead Poor Law Union
  • Faringdon Poor Law Union
  • Hungerford Poor Law Union
  • Newbury Poor Law Union
  • Reading Poor Law Union
  • Wallingford Poor Law Union
  • Wantage Poor Law Union
  • Windsor Poor Law Union
  • Wokingham Poor Law Union

Berkshire Hundreds

  • Berkshire Hundreds
  • Beynhurst Hundred
  • Bray Hundred
  • Charlton Hundred
  • Compton Hundred
  • Cookham Hundred
  • Faircross Hundred
  • Faringdon Hundred
  • Hormer Hundred
  • Kintbury Eagle Hundred
  • Lambourn Hundred
  • Moreton Hundred
  • Ock Hundred
  • Reading Hundred
  • Ripplesmere Hundred
  • Shrivenham Hundred
  • Sonning Hundred
  • Theale Hundred
  • Wantage Hundred
  • Wargrave Hundred

Members of Parliament

Members of Parliament for 1869

  • Lieut.-Col. Robert Loyd Lindsay, v.c, Lockinge House, Wantage, and 2 Carlton-gardens, London s.w.;
  • John Walter, Esq., Bearwood, Wokingham, and 40 Upper Grosvenor-street, London w.;
  • Richard Benyon, Esq., Englefleld House, Reading, and 17 Grosvenor-square, London W.

Hospitals and Asylums

Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading
Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading The old main entrance on London Road. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Royal Berkshire Hospital, London-road, Reading, — Her Majesty the Queen, patroness; Rev. George Bishop, chaplain; Owen Evans, house surgeon; D. B. Skey, secretary and house steward; Miss Ellen Smith, superintendent. The Counties Lunatic Asylum (Oxford and Berks) is situated at Littlemore, Oxfordshire. R. H. H. Sankey, resident medical superintendent; J. M. Davenport, Esq., clerk to committee; Rev. Samuel Paris Hill, B.A. chaplain; Joseph John Andrews, steward and clerk.

Law and Legislation

Coroners

Coroners for the County (1869)

  • A. D. Bartlett, Abingdon (Abingdon district);
  • J. Alexander, Newbury (Newbury district);
  • R. Clarke, Reading (Reading district);
  • W. Wasbrough, Wantage (Wantage district).

Police

The county police force consists of a chief constable, 8 superintendents, 2 inspectors, 12 sergeants and 91 constables — total, 114. Colonel Adam Blandy, of Reading, is the chief constable, and William Grant is the chief clerk and superintendent; the head quarters are at Reading, and the County Police Station is in the Forbury, Reading; the reserve force of the county is also stationed at Reading.

Gaols

County Gaol
County Gaol (Photo credit: Reading Tom)

There are two county gaols, one at Abingdon and the other at Reading. The County Gaol in Bridge-street, Abingdon, is a plain stone building, erected in 1811, at an expense of £26,000: it includes a chapel and court house: it is now unoccupied. The County Gaol, Forbury, Reading, is a red brick castellated building with white stone dressings; Samuel Ferry, governor.

Berkshire Hundreds

The following is a list of the hundreds in the county, with the parishes contained in each :—

Hundred of Beynhurst — Bisham, Bray, Hurley, Remenham, Shottesbrook, and White Waltham.

Hundred of Charlton — Barkham, Broad Hinton, Earley, Finchamstead, Hartley Dummer, Shinfleld, Swallowfield (part of), and Whistley-in-Hurst.

Hundred of Compton — Aldworth, Catmore, Chilton, Compton or Compton Parva, East Ilsley or Market Ilsley, Farnborough or Farmborough, and West Ilsley.

Hundred of Cookham — Binfield, Cookham, and Sunninghill.

Hundred of Faircross — Bagley Wood, Beedon, Boxford, Brightwaltham, Brimpton, Chandlings Farm, Chieveley, Frilsham, Greenham, Hampstead Norris, Leckhampstead, Midgham, Peasemore, Sandleford, Shaw-cum-Donnington, Speen, Stanford Dingley, Wasing, Welford, Winterbourn, and Yattendon.

Hundred of Faringdon — Great Coxwell, Great Faringdon (part of), and Little Coxwell.

Hundred of Ganfield — Buckland, Charney, Hatford, Hinton Waldrist, Longworth, Pusey, Shellingford, and Stamford-in-the-Vale.

Hundred of Hormer — Besselsleigh, Cholsall, Cumnor, Kennington, Northcourt, North Hinksey, Radley, St. Helen (Abingdon), Sandford, Seacourt, Shippon, South Hinksey, Sunningwell, Thrupp and Wick, Wootton, and Wytham.

Hundred of Kintbury Eagle — Avington, Chaddleworth, Chilton Foliatt (part of), East Challow, East Shefford, Enborne, Fawley, Hampstead Marshall, Hungerford, Inkpen, Kintbury, Letcombe Basset, Letcombe Regis, Shalbourn (part of), West Challow, West Shefford, and West Woodhay.

Hundred of Lambourn — Blagrave, East Garston, Eastbury and Bockhampton, Hadley, and Lambourn.

Hundred of Moreton— Allhallows (Wallingford), Ashampstead, Aston Tirrold, Aston Upthorpe, Basildon, Brightwell, Clapcot, Didcot or Dudcott, East Hagbourne, Harwell, Moulsford, North Moreton, Sotwell, South Moreton, Streatley, Upton with Nottingham Fee, and West Hagbourne.

Hundred of Ock — Appleford, Appleton and Eaton, Denchworth (part of), Draycot Moor, Drayton, Frilford, Fyfield, Garford, Goosey, Kingston Bagpuize, Little Witenham, Long Wittenham, Lyford, Marcham, Milton, Steventon, Sutton Courtney, Sutton Wick, and Tubney.

Hundred of Reading — Beenham Vallence, Blewberry, Bucklebury, Cholsey, Graizeley or Grasley, Paugbourn, St. Giles (Reading), St. Lawrence (Reading), St. Mary (Reading), Southcot, Sulhampstead Abbots, Swallowfield (part of), Thatcham, Tilehurst, and Whitley.

Hundred of Ripplesmere — Clewer, Dedworth, Easthampstead, Old Windsor, and Winkfield with Ascot.

Hundred of Shrivenham — Ashbury, Balking, Beckett, Bourton, Buscot, Coleshill, Compton Beauchamp, Eaton Hastings, Fernham, Great Faringdon (part of), Idstone, Kingston Lisle with Fawler, Kingstone Winslow, Longcot, Odstone, Shrivenham, Utfington, Watchfleld, and Woolstone.

Hundred of Sonning — Arborfleld, Newland, Ruscombe, Sandhurst, Sonnington, Winnersh, Wokingham and Woodley, with Sandford.

Hundred of Theale — Aldermaston, Bradfield, Burghfield, Englefield, Padworth, Purley, Stratfield Mortimer, Sulham, Sulhampstead Bannister, Tidmarsh, Ufton or Ufton Nervet, Wokefleld, and Woolhampton.

Hundred of Wantage — Ardington, Charlton, Childrey, Denchworth (part of), East Hanney, East Hendred, East Lockinge, Grove, Sparsholt, Wantage, West Hanney, West Hendred, West Lockinge.

Hundred of Wargrave — Waltham St. Lawrence, Warfleld, and Wargrave.

Borough of Abingdon — St. Helen and St. Nicholas.

Borough of Maidenhead — Maidenhead.

Borough of Newbury — Newbury.

Borough of New Windsor — New Windsor.

Borough of Reading — St. Giles, St. Lawrence, and St. Mary.

Borough of Wallingford — Allhallows, St. Leonard, St. Mary-le-More, St. Peter, and Wallingford Castle Precinct.

Sources

Post Office Directory of Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire and Oxfordshire; E. R. Kelly; Kelly & Co., London. 1869.

Faringdon Hundred Berkshire Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland Gorton 1833

FARINGDON, or FARRINGDON, co. Berks. Pop. 3631.

A hundred at the north-west corner of the county, bordering on Gloucestershire, containing six parishes, including the town from which it takes its name.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of Great Britain and Ireland by John Gorton. The Irish and Welsh articles by G. N. Wright; Vol. II; London; Chapman and Hall, 186, Strand; 1833.